Earlier this week at the Digital Summit in Nashville, RIAA ringleader Mitch Bainwol spoke on the RIAA's litigious nature and their love of DRM. Unsurprisingly, he let loose with a bunch of steamy, BS-scented PR-speak that we're here to smash into a thousand little pieces.

Bainwol: "I believe in rules. They are essential to the American way of life."
Giz: Correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't a big part of the whole rule-following American way of life that the government is the entity that makes and enforces the rules? I don't recall seeing anything in the constitution that states that visionless industry groups are the judge, jury and executioner when they feel threatened. The rules you should be following are those such as people are innocent until proven guilty.

Advertisement

Bainwol: "Universities are supposed to be the defenders of intellectual thought, and students are learning exactly the wrong lesson."
Giz: Last time I checked, there aren't any schools out there teaching a "How to Violate Intellectual Property Laws" class. Universities provide their students with fast Internet connections, and what they do with it is their own choice. The fact that young people pirate music more than any other demographic isn't a sign that colleges are teaching bad ethics, but more a sign that younger generations isn't willing to support your old business model in a completely changed era. Adapt or die, RIAA.

Bainwol: "DRM serves all sorts of pro-consumer purposes."
Giz: Oh, really? Can you name a single one? No? I didn't think so. Why make a statement like this with no examples? Just because you say DRM is pro-consumer doesn't make it true, Mitch. Get back to me when you add some substance to your argument.

Advertisement

Digital Music News [via Broadband Reports]