Breaking: Mossberg Reviews the iPhone, Says Keyboard A-OK After Five Days

Mossberg and Boehret review the iPhone, 3 minutes after Pogue at the NYTimes. In a nutshell:

Our verdict is that, despite some flaws and feature omissions, the iPhone is, on balance, a beautiful and breakthrough handheld computer. Its software, especially, sets a new bar for the smart-phone industry, and its clever finger-touch interface, which dispenses with a stylus and most buttons, works well, though it sometimes adds steps to common functions.
And more importantly, unlike Pogue, he likes the keyboard:
The iPhone's most controversial feature, the omission of a physical keyboard in favor of a virtual keyboard on the screen, turned out in our tests to be a nonissue, despite our deep initial skepticism. After five days of use, Walt — who did most of the testing for this review — was able to type on it as quickly and accurately as he could on the Palm Treo he has used for years. This was partly because of smart software that corrects typing errors on the fly.

Then Mossberg complains about some missing features:

The iPhone is missing some features common on some competitors. There's no instant messaging, only standard text messaging. While its two megapixel camera took excellent pictures in our tests, it can't record video. Its otherwise excellent Web browser can't fully utilize some Web sites, because it doesn't yet support Adobe's Flash technology. Although the phone contains a complete iPod, you can't use your songs as ringtones. There aren't any games, nor is there any way to directly access Apple's iTunes Music Store.

(I'm not sure other browsers on phones support Flash, but I get the point.)
IPhone is Breakthrough Handheld Computer [WSJ]