IBM NanoPrinting Delivers 100,000 dpi and The Future

IBM has developed a new printing technique that can achieve 100,000 dpi in a world dominated by 1,500 dpi printers. Creating 60-nanometer dots 100 times smaller than a red blood cell, the exact process will be detailed in an upcoming journal article. What we know at the moment is that these printers use "direct assembly," meaning that every dot is extremely accurate as defined by geometric templates (no somewhat chaotic pigment dispersion).

IBM sees use for the technology beyond your next extremely anatomically correct version of Playboy. The technique is precise enough to print nanowires. And hopefully that means cheap nanocircuits are on the horizon (even if 60nm may be too large for my dream applications of creating tiny robots that destroy the world or at least your pancreas). Apparently there are also promises in the way of tiny optical lenses, which hopefully will lead to tiny lasers for my tiny robots. [multiply via gizmowatch]