Yes, music takes you places, and this was true 100 years ago too, when sheet music was the most widespread form of distributing popular music. And in the age of the Wright brothers, when powered flight started to gain ground, aviation became a significant theme in popular music. The following collection proves this very well.

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It is amazing and weird at the same time to see how the vision of aviation technology and early 20th century popular music were fitted together in these sheet music covers depicting travellers–both men and women–aboard all kind of aircraft–no matter lighter or heavier than air–in flight, even in outer space.

Ed Roberts: Aces High. Belwin, 1918.

Source: Smithsonian Libraries


Anton Weiss: Aero Travelers. Carl Fischer, 1909.

Source: Smithsonian Libraries


Harry J. Lincoln: A hummer–march two step. Vandersloot Music Pub. Co., 1914.

Source: Smithsonian Libraries


John L. Greenawald: American conquest–march and two step. Emil Ascher, 1911.

Source: Smithsonian Libraries


F.W. Meacham: American patrol–march. Morris Music Pub. Co., 1914.

Source: Smithsonian Libraries


J. Luxton: Battle in the sky. Church, Paxson & Co., 1915.

Source: Smithsonian Libraries


Charles Leslie Johnson: Cloud Kisser–rag, two step. Forster, 1911.

Source: Smithsonian Libraries


George Fairman: Davy Jones and his monoplane. Tell Taylor, 1911.

Source: Smithsonian Libraries


Fred Fisher: Come Josephine in my flying machine (Up she goes!). Shapiro, 1910.

Source: Smithsonian Libraries


Frank Chapin Cutler: Come to my castles, love. Cutler-Field Music Co., 1920.

Source: Smithsonian Libraries


George Evans: Come, take a trip in my air ship. Chas. K. Harris, 1904.

Source: Smithsonian Libraries


Max Kortlander: Drop me down in Dixie. Lee S. Roberts, 1918.

Source: Smithsonian Libraries


Julius K. Johnson: King of the air. Koninsky Music Co, 1910

Source: Smithsonian Libraries


Arthur Lange: If I could see as far ahead as I can see behind. Jos. W. Stern & Co, 1910.

Source: Smithsonian Libraries


Lee S. Roberts: I miss you Miss America. Jos. W. Stern & Co, 1916.

Source: Smithsonian Libraries


Harry Von Tilzer: Sleepy moon. Harry Von Tilzer Music Pub. Co, 1915.

Source: Smithsonian Libraries


Jessy L. Deppen: Skylark. Sam Fox Pub. Co, 1913.

Source: Smithsonian Libraries


Clifford V. Baker: A trip to the moon. Koninsky Music Co., 1907.

Source: Smithsonian Libraries


Frederick W. Hager: Sixty miles an hour. Jos. Morris Co, 1910.

Source: Smithsonian Libraries


Irving Bibo. Since Katy the waitress (became an aviatress). Irving Berlin, Inc, 1919.

Source: Smithsonian Libraries


Harry Von Tilzer: Says I to myself, says I. Harry Von Tilzer Music Pub. Co, 1917.

Source: Smithsonian Libraries


Alfred Solman: Smile on. Jos. W. Stern & Co, 1909.

Source: Smithsonian Libraries


Jack Glogau: The aeroplane. Will Rossiter, 1913,

Source: Smithsonian Libraries


T. Mayo Geary: The airships parade. Goetz, 1902.

Source: Smithsonian Libraries


Lew C. Smith: The air line. Seidel Music Pub. Co, 1915.

Source: Smithsonian Libraries


James M. Fulton: The aviator–march and two-step. Ernest S. Williams, 1908.

Source: Smithsonian Libraries


Albert Von Tilzer: Take me up with you dearie. York Music Co, 1909.

Source: Smithsonian Libraries


Isaac Doles: The air ship waltz. Issac Doles, 1891.

Source: Smithsonian Libraries


Louis A. Hirsch: Ev’rybody ought to know how to do the tickle toe new society dance from the musical play Going up. M. Witmark & SonsB. Feldman & Co, 1918.

Source: Smithsonian Libraries


Chas. L. Johnson: Dill pickles. Carl Hoffman Music Co, 1906.

Source: Smithsonian Libraries