And the Lord came to Dr. Daniel Low and told him: "Praise the iPhone, for it can make your calls, get your mail, play your music, browse the web, and now help kids go to surgery without having to use sedatives to calm them down!" And the Lord—who looked remarkably like this guy— gave him one, and then he took it to the kids at the Seattle Children's Hospital, where he raised it up on high, saying: "first, shalt thou watch the videos. Then shalt thou calm the hell down, no more, no less." And the children calmed down, and he saw it was good. So good, in fact, that he has used it for six months with 450 children, reducing the use of drugs by 85%. But how does it work?

Getting children to the operating room is extremely scary for them (and us too), so they usually have to be sedated to calm them down. Dr. Low observed that by watching some videos on the iPhone, his kids got completely disconnected from the outside world. He thought that this effect could help children in the hospital get distracted—especially when they leave the room where they wait with their parents—so he gave it a try.

It worked. And for six months, he has used this method with 450 children, reducing the use of sedatives by 85%. The benefit not only makes the children a little bit less nervous: without sedatives, kids wake up smoother and are less drowsy after the operation, so they can get back home more quickly.

Of course, this can be done with any video playing device, but Dr. Low seems to believe that the iPhone is perfect for the job, arguing that it doesn't interfere with the equipment and can be easily sanitized. We are sure that the same can be said about other personal media players, but whatever helps kids is fine with us. [King5]