Review: Scrubbing Bubbles Automatic Shower Cleaner is the Worst Gadget I Have Ever Used In My Entire LifeS

I've never been so thoroughly disappointed with a gadget than I am with the Scrubbing Bubbles Automatic Shower Cleaner. You might have seen one of these in the aisles of Target or Wal-Mart and thought it would be an amazing way to keep your shower clean. After all, the Ad copy says, "It's like a MAID. Times TWO!" You'd be dreaming of two hot robot french maid androids, keeping your human cleaning receptacles spotless. But this stuff does not work. DO NOT BUY. UPDATE: Just got hate mail for this post. Sounds like a douchebag rep for the product shilling hard.

You hang the device on your shower head. The included proprietary cleaner bottles gravity-feed into the rotating nozzle and pump, powered by 4 AA batteries. You push a button after you're done showering and after half a minute of warning beeps, the turret fires off the cleaning fluid in a 360-degree pattern. It's supposed to be a robotic anti shower dirt artillery cannon. It is is not.

Over a few weeks, a mild and inexcusable pattern of soap scum (infantry in the army of shower gunk) built up onto my bathtub. Was it by chance some serious buildup? No. Some strong stuff in the purple squirt bottle applied and a non abrasive sponge took it right off.

Honestly, I think they're selling this thing on the fantasy of clean bathrooms and fear of mildew alone. The snake oil product, which I tested for about two months, might make a good base for an automated scarecrow weapon in the garden triggered by some motion sensor. But it won't do anything for your bathtub that a sponge, some elbow grease and the most caustic material your lungs and skin can handle can't do better and cheaper. Especially the original Scrubbing Bubbles stuff, which I am a fan of.

Robot bathroom cleaner, zero; human domestic man servant, 1.

UPDATE: Just got this hate mail from this guy, josh.pruitt@gmail.com

This is clearly an angry attack on a product. Lots of people I know

(self included) use this product and have been satisfied with its

performance for years. The article is completely biased and shows a

lack of research. There's no indication that Brian contacted Arm &

Hammer for help with finding out why the product wasn't performing as

expected. Just because a product doesn't work for you doesn't mean

it's "snake oil." This product isn't even related to the theme of

Gizmodo.

"Hello Arm and Hammer, your thingy I bought doesn't work. Can you please explain why? Oh, ok. Good answer. Thanks. Bye." *goes back to using lame shower cleaner with a deeper understanding of why it fucking sucks.*