Mini Coyote Saves Us from the Worst Orwellian Abomination Ever: Speedtrap CamerasOf all the Big Brother things corporations, governments, and other nosy entities that want to examine all the minutiae of our daily lives looking for transgressions of stupid little rules, I feel like speedtrap cameras are the most egregious. Endemic in Europe, they're gaining a foothold in the US. They break the whole system that governs the way we drive on American highways, the fundamental fairness of the road, that unspoken agreement between poh-lice and people who drive: It's only speeding if a living, breathing cop spots you. And even then, they might just let you pass. The Mini Coyote from Novus can restore this balance. It's a GPS device that sits on your dashboard and relays the position of speeding cameras in just three seconds, giving you enough time to slow down while remaining within the limits of the law (in France, at least). It relies on fellow freedom lovers to report the position of speed cameras, but so far it's been a success—27,000 cameras were reported by 50,000 drivers in September alone. And you know what? Despite British tightwads saying that it opens drivers to prosecution for "peverting the course of justice," Novus has a real point in arguing that it improves safety in at least one way—it means fewer people slamming on their brakes as they spot a camera, preventing collisions. I find the whole argument that it's unfair annoying. Red light cameras, I'm okay with. It's never, ever safe to run a red light. On the other hand, more speed, unencumbered, can actually mean fewer fatalities and accidents. And these things are no substitute for actual police officers who can make real decisions. Besides that, tech one-upmanship is the whole game: Cops get radar, drivers get radar detectors. They move to laser, detectors pick up laser. It's as American as apple pie, Cheetos and Mountain Dew. So the Mini Coyote can't get here fast enough. [Pocket Lint]