Apocalyptic Machine Scultpures are Wonderful in a Morbid, Sinister Sort of Way

Judging from his uber-dark, mech'd-out artwork, Kris Kuksi probably had a disturbing childhood (or dropped acid in graveyards). But it doesn't make his pieces any less awesome.

Apocalyptic Machine Scultpures are Wonderful in a Morbid, Sinister Sort of Way

Apocalyptic Machine Scultpures are Wonderful in a Morbid, Sinister Sort of Way

Apocalyptic Machine Scultpures are Wonderful in a Morbid, Sinister Sort of Way

Apocalyptic Machine Scultpures are Wonderful in a Morbid, Sinister Sort of Way

Apocalyptic Machine Scultpures are Wonderful in a Morbid, Sinister Sort of Way

Apocalyptic Machine Scultpures are Wonderful in a Morbid, Sinister Sort of Way

Apocalyptic Machine Scultpures are Wonderful in a Morbid, Sinister Sort of Way

Apocalyptic Machine Scultpures are Wonderful in a Morbid, Sinister Sort of Way

Apocalyptic Machine Scultpures are Wonderful in a Morbid, Sinister Sort of Way

Apocalyptic Machine Scultpures are Wonderful in a Morbid, Sinister Sort of Way

Apocalyptic Machine Scultpures are Wonderful in a Morbid, Sinister Sort of Way

Apocalyptic Machine Scultpures are Wonderful in a Morbid, Sinister Sort of Way

Apocalyptic Machine Scultpures are Wonderful in a Morbid, Sinister Sort of Way

Apocalyptic Machine Scultpures are Wonderful in a Morbid, Sinister Sort of Way

Apocalyptic Machine Scultpures are Wonderful in a Morbid, Sinister Sort of Way

Apocalyptic Machine Scultpures are Wonderful in a Morbid, Sinister Sort of Way

Kuksi's sculptures and dioramas (bas-reliefs if you wanna get technical about it) tend to look at the tensions between the old world and the modern one, with heavy emphasis on themes of religion, conquest and death. And he managed to accomplish all this while still maintaining a tech sensibility to his work that threw me into an all out nerdgasm. Like Art Machines points out, these images don't do the works justice, but you can zoom around over on Kuksi's site and check out all the intricacies.

Some pieces, particularly the ones involving tanks, are overtly political, while others focus heavily on the religious. But my personal favorites are the one shown above, the piece with the Zeppelin, and the work of the skeleton cradling a village—which looks vaguely like Zion (the underground city in the Matrix) crossed with ancient Japanese mythology. And there are tons more sculptures over on Kuksi's site you should definitely check out. [Kris Kuksi via Art Machines]