CT Scanner Bares Apple Notebook, PS3, and Big Mac to Their Core

Satre Stuelke seems to have three passions: McDonald's fast food, toys, and gadgets—specially the GE 4-slice medical research scanner he uses to create these stunning images and videos at Cornell University's Biomedical Imaging Centre:

CT Scanner Bares Apple Notebook, PS3, and Big Mac to Their Core

CT Scanner Bares Apple Notebook, PS3, and Big Mac to Their Core

CT Scanner Bares Apple Notebook, PS3, and Big Mac to Their Core

CT Scanner Bares Apple Notebook, PS3, and Big Mac to Their Core

CT Scanner Bares Apple Notebook, PS3, and Big Mac to Their Core

CT Scanner Bares Apple Notebook, PS3, and Big Mac to Their Core

CT Scanner Bares Apple Notebook, PS3, and Big Mac to Their Core

CT Scanner Bares Apple Notebook, PS3, and Big Mac to Their Core

CT Scanner Bares Apple Notebook, PS3, and Big Mac to Their Core

CT Scanner Bares Apple Notebook, PS3, and Big Mac to Their Core

CT Scanner Bares Apple Notebook, PS3, and Big Mac to Their Core

CT Scanner Bares Apple Notebook, PS3, and Big Mac to Their Core

CT Scanner Bares Apple Notebook, PS3, and Big Mac to Their Core

CT Scanner Bares Apple Notebook, PS3, and Big Mac to Their Core

CT Scanner Bares Apple Notebook, PS3, and Big Mac to Their Core

CT Scanner Bares Apple Notebook, PS3, and Big Mac to Their Core

CT Scanner Bares Apple Notebook, PS3, and Big Mac to Their Core

CT Scanner Bares Apple Notebook, PS3, and Big Mac to Their Core

CT Scanner Bares Apple Notebook, PS3, and Big Mac to Their Core

CT Scanner Bares Apple Notebook, PS3, and Big Mac to Their Core

CT Scanner Bares Apple Notebook, PS3, and Big Mac to Their Core

CT Scanner Bares Apple Notebook, PS3, and Big Mac to Their Core

CT Scanner Bares Apple Notebook, PS3, and Big Mac to Their Core

CT Scanner Bares Apple Notebook, PS3, and Big Mac to Their Core

Stuelke—a medical student and artist—started this project back in the summer of 2007, using the four-slice General Electric scanner at Cornell. He uses the scanner when nobody is using it for more serious tasks than capturing the most intimate guts of these mundane objects. Stuelke then processes the resulting DICOM images—the standard file format in radiology and tomography—in an iMac, using a software called Osirix.

The results, as you can see in the gallery and the videos, are at times surprising, at times spooky, but always beautiful. [Radiologyart—Thanks Don]