The Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine is part of a consortium of researchers working to apply the science of regenerative medicine to battlefield injuries. For example, two projects are to engineer a human ear and a finger in the laboratory, with the ultimate goal of being able to engineer an entire limb. Here, scientists seed ear and finger scaffolds with cells.

Ink jet technology is being used at the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine to print tissues and organs. Here, scientists print a small two-chamber heart to illustrate the process.

As part of the process of engineering muscle in the lab, it is "exercised" in a device that mimics the work it would do in the body. This helps it develop the properties it would need to function.

As part of the process of engineering a heart valve in the lab, it is "exercised" in a device that mimics the work it would do in the body. This helps it develop the properties it would need to function.

As part of the process of engineering a blood vessel in the lab, it is "exercised" in a device that mimics the work it would do in the body. This helps it develop the properties it would need to function.