Ford Sync-equipped cars will soon get apps, but not in the way you'd expect: instead of running on the Sync platform, they're simply controlled by it. The actual app—like Pandora, seen here—runs on your smartphone.

The forthcoming Sync development kit, then, isn't for developers to write new apps for Sync, but to give them the tools they need to write smartphone apps that can communicate with Sync cars' head units. For Pandora and Stitcher, this means controls and track info are run through the steering wheel buttons and head unit LCD; for OpenBeak (new name for TwitterBerry) this means that your Ford will read your Twitter timeline aloud.

As we've said before, this makes sense. It'd be tough to convince people write standalone apps for a car, but not too hard to convince smartphone app developers to add Sync compatibility to their existing iPhone, Android or BB apps. [Ford]