Two Important Updates to Gizmodo: #Broken and #Lifechanger

Gizmodo is a blog, yes, but it's also become a more encompassing entity—one that's dynamically enriched by its readership. And we can think of nothing more important for you to share than the real-world stories about your gadgets.

Our larger commenting guide can tell you more about the ins and outs of commenting on Gizmodo (for instance, you don't even need to click on a story to comment, you can do so from the "Got a tip for us?" window in the Gizmodo title bar).

Today, I'm more focused on two particular tags that you can add to any comment on Gizmodo.

#Broken

For whenever a device hasn't lived up to its promises or a company has just screwed you royally, tip the #broken tag. Not only will it allow you a place to vent (which helps, trust me); having all of these complaints in one place allows us to spot/legitimize trends. Plus, it's my personal hope that particularly savvy companies will be smart enough to peruse the #broken tag to ensure that their customer base is happy.

You may recognize #broken as the same tag we've been using to follow the Faulty iMac Saga. That's really just the start of what #broken can be—your participation will make it far more relevant and powerful.

#Lifechanger

But all gadgets don't always suck (that's why, ultimately, we're all hanging out at Gizmodo). To laud the gadgets and everyday devices, from new to antiquated, from ordinary to extraordinary, that you just could not live without, use our #lifechanger tag.

We debuted #lifechanger with my ode to Pyrex Colors bowls. In an era when we covet everything new and shiny, the idea that something lacking logos and multi million dollar marketing campaigns can make our lives better is more important to acknowledge than ever before. (Though, if you just want to talk about your totally spectacular Nexus One, that's fine too.)

Ultimately, it's not any small group of technology editors writing for any publication who decide whether or not a product is relevant; it's the masses, the people who buy the products and use them, rather than just "test" or "review" them, in their everyday lives.

You are the masses, so make these spaces your own, and allow Gizmodo to speak in a new, truer way.