Remainders - The Things We Didn't Post: Long and Winding Road Edition

In today's Remainders: journeys. The Xof1 solar-powered saucer car readies for a trek across a Canadian ice road; analysts rain on the Verizon iPhone rumor parade; Google Buzz headaches reach the White House; planetary orbits, visualized and musicalized; and more.

Remainders - The Things We Didn't Post: Long and Winding Road Edition

•The last we heard of the Xof1 solar powered car, its flying-saucer shape was getting it into trouble with the local authorities. But you can't keep a good solar-powered saucer car down: the Xof1 will be attempting to cross a 185km ice road in Canada's Northwest Territories. [GreenDiary]

•Oh hey, remember all those rumors yesterday about a new iPhone coming out for Verizon that had everyone all excited? Well, analysts, wet blankets that they are, had to go and ruin the fun. Maynard J. Um, an analyst who is only indecisive in name, was quick to deem a Verizon launch "unlikely" for this year, with CDMA iPhones possibly going to China Telecom or Japan's KDDI. Um, whatever. [AppleInsider]

•A new survey shows that Apple owners are 40% more interested in the iPad that non Apple owners. And analysts are 100% more interested in this meaningless statistic than anyone else who reads it. [PRWeb]

•Wired has been gung-ho about tablets since the start, thanks in no small part to their dapper Creative Director Scott Dadich. In a new interview with eBookNewser, Dadich offers some good insight on how the iPad "fundamentally changes the graphic design" of magazines. [eBookNewser]

•In case you thought annoyance with Google Buzz's automatic friend following business A. was reserved for common citizens or B. had blown over completely, well, you're wrong. White House deputy chief technology officer Andrew McLaughlin, who just happens to be Google's former public policy head, had the same grievances you did when Buzz launched in February. [All Things D]

Remainders - The Things We Didn't Post: Long and Winding Road Edition


•With SolarBeat, a cool Flash tool for visualizing the time it takes planets to orbit the sun, our solar system has never been more sonorous. [Solar Beat]