Did Syrians Already Get Revenge Against Anonymous?

Syrian government kills Syrians. Anonymous attacks Syrian government. Syrians attack Anonymous? It's hard to tell who's behind what right now, but some are claiming just that—a next-day revenge strike. But did the Syrians even hit the right target?

The purported hack struck AnonPlus, the Anonymous social networking site birthed after the collective was booted from Google+. It seems like a pretty clear case of hacker versus hacker retribution, executed by the established Syrian Electronic Army, according to University of Toronto researchers.

But Anonymous says they've got nothing to do with AnonPlus—and they never did. Anonymous' upper honcho Sabu says "It was a group of people whoring for attn...Im starting to think this is a troll site. Its always conveniently getting randomly hacked Has little to do with us." It's certainly possible—there's nothing stopping anyone from starting any site they'd like and flying the Anonymous flag over it for attention. And Sabu, despite his claims that the movement has no actual leaders, is certainly the closest thing to one. So if he says AnonPlus was just some kid's joke of a side project, an attack by Syrians would mean little. Or, like he said, maybe it wasn't hacked at all, but self-defaced to try to paint a black eye on Anonymous.

If you're confused, that's okay—so are we. Confusion is the name of the game, and helps Anonymous—however anyone wants to define it—stay that way. It also makes it easy to shrug off enemies. [ComputerWorld via Geekosystem]


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