NSFW: Breast-Crazed Hacker Steals Naked Phone Photos of Christina Hendricks and Olivia Munn Glee Star

What a way to start the week! Body-worshipped Hollywood TV brass Christina Hendricks (of Mad Men fame) and Olivia Munn (of, uh, yeah...) Heather Morris (of Glee cheerleader fame) has had her body posted across the internet due to unwanted cellphone prying. Yes, it happened, again.

NSFW: Breast-Crazed Hacker Steals Naked Phone Photos of Christina Hendricks and Olivia Munn Glee Star

The images—grainy and certainly phone-birthed—range from salacious to full on bare-breasted, and appear to have been taken on both a phone and webcam. Hendricks' people deny on the fully nude shot. Munn, on the other hand? Who knows! Does she have a publicity rep, or do her creepy nerd fanboys speak for her through Reddit? We're awaiting a statement. We do know that her pics—allegedly intended for a boyfriend at the time—date back to 2009, and were taken on two different BlackBerries, judging by EXIF data stored inside the images.

The shots appear to have been taken with an iPhone 3GS, based on EXIF data, and thanks to our modern era of embedded GPS, we know at least one of the racy pics was taken directly inside Paramount's studios .

NSFW: Breast-Crazed Hacker Steals Naked Phone Photos of Christina Hendricks and Olivia Munn Glee Star

But the lesson here remains the same. As we said when this happened to ScarJo: If You Are Famous and Take Nude Photos of Yourself, They Will End Up on the Internet. As impossibly good looking people, pictures of your impossibly attractive body are coveted by legions of Internet People who want to look at them briefly, email them around, grin, high five, and then go back to work. And there are a select few with the guile to yank those photos off your phone—where they are certainly not safe:

Once directed to the malicious site, the phone's web browser and operating system can be silently compromised. Imagine something like jailbreakme.com, which swiftly frees your iPhone of Apple's customization restrictions. Except instead of inviting a program into your phone to help you free it from Apple's beautiful bondage, you've actually invited in a Trojan horse filled with horribleness. A maliciously crafted file creeping from the site to your phone could add code to your phone's web browser and operating system. That code could persuade it to do things it usually wouldn't want to do, like shipping out photos to unintended recipients.

More likely, though-and more applicable to you and me-security experts suspect that someone broke into an online service that stored the pictures, not the phone itself. (In other words, no Swordfish antics here. Your BlackBerrys and iPhones are safe!) If she emailed the pics to the person she intended to please, or used a photo syncing service to send her photos to the cloud for sharing, a simple compromised password or a lame security question is all it took to give the hacker entry.

So, yes, here they are. Enjoy, be outraged, hide your child's eyes. But whatever you do, do this:

Do not take pictures of yourself naked on your phone. Do not take pictures of yourself naked on your phone. Do not take pictures of yourself naked on your phone. Do not take pictures of yourself naked on your phone. Do not take pictures of yourself naked on your phone. Do not take pictures of yourself naked on your phone. Do not take pictures of yourself naked on your phone. Do not take pictures of yourself naked on your phone. Do not take pictures of yourself naked on your phone. Do not take pictures of yourself naked on your phone.[IDontLikeYouInThatWay]

This post originally appeared on Gizmodo, March 5th, 2012