Fighting to Die, Making Washing Machines Fly, and Gaming the Coriolis Effect to Smoke a Better Bowl

Roll that spliff phatly, pack some fresh ice into the binger, and set the Volcano to "toastify." It's time for tonight's Stoner Channel. We've collected our best high-times material for the discerning pothead so sit back, relax, and pass that shit on the left, yo.

PSA: If you have indoor grow experience hit me up, I want to talk lighting and ventilation.

Tonight's submission from 5Kunk begs the question, what good is an Apple if you can't smoke out of it?

Click here for more hits from the bong.

The Lady and the Reaper

See, Disney only changed the plot of the movie around to include dogs when they hit a snag in the spaghetti scene. Of course the Angel of Death can't suck down pasta—he has no lips.

I Have Never Seen Anything Like These Tornadoes On the Surface of the Sun

Let me go wild, like a twister in the sun.

The Man Who Made Things Fly

Making a washing machine fly is just slightly easier than getting Killer to fly. And yet, through the powers of agricultural engineering, Rupert Brandon-King did just that.

How a Particle Accelerator Works: Explained With Donuts and Chocolate Bars

You had me at fried dough and Kit Kats

Fighting to Die, Making Washing Machines Fly, and Gaming the Coriolis Effect to Smoke a Better Bowl

The Vortex Gravity Bong

When I was still in school, my roomies and I would fill a dorm-supplied trash can 3/4-full with water—it held about two gallons. We then sliced the bottom from a 2-liter bottle, jammed a family bowl (you know, those comically large ones that hold two grams) into a rubber stopper and plugged the stopper into the bottle. If you submerged the bottle, then lit the bowl and lifted the assembly out of the water, the evacuating water would draw a phat-stacked cloud. Then it was just a matter of pulling the stopper and inhaling.

The Vortex Gravity bong from Vortex Water Pipes works on the same principle but without the circus needed by the home-brew method to actually get a hit. It's an enclosed cylinder, split into an upper and lower half. You fill the upper chamber with water, then light the bowl, and twist the drain spigot. As the water pours from the upper chamber into the lower it generates a strong vacuum that will stacks your smoke. The Gravity Vortex comes in either 14 or 24-inch lengths, a variety of colors, and retails for about $100, depending on where you shop. [Vortex - thanks, swunderful]

Nine Minutes of People Who Shouldn't Be Using Guns, Using Guns

You and I both know this will not end well

Fighting to Die, Making Washing Machines Fly, and Gaming the Coriolis Effect to Smoke a Better Bowl

I Don't Understand Why Auto Polo Never Caught On, It Looks So Safe

You pansy kids today don't know how good you've got it—with your helmets and seat-belts and fluoridated water. Why, in my day we chased after volley balls in convertible jalopies while braining one another with wooden mallets. AND WE LIKED IT THAT WAY.

Fighting to Die, Making Washing Machines Fly, and Gaming the Coriolis Effect to Smoke a Better Bowl

Are You a Green Gardener?

Care to show off your handiwork to the Internets? If so, we want pics of your best buds, your highest-tech setups, and your bushiest bushes. Send images—960x540 minimum but we prefer 1600x900—of your legal stashes (no High Times ripoffs please) to atarantola at Gizmodo.com and we'll feature the best at the top each night's Stoner Channel. Put "The Stoner Channel" in the subject line while you're at it.

And no, for the last time, we aren't interested in seeing your wicked meth lab setup Jerry. Stop it or we're calling the fuzz.

Image: Curtis Barnard / Shutterstock