Comcast-Time Warner, Pebble Steel, And Our Boss Kidnapped in VegasS

This week, we learned that Comcast and Time Warner are merging to create a cable superjuggernaut; Gizmodo's Editor in Chief Geoff Manaugh learned how to escape kidnapping in Las Vegas; and we played with the Pebble Steel smartwatch and NYC's new touchscreen subway maps. And so much more!

Why the Comcast-Time Warner Cable Merger Is Even Worse Than You Think

Comcast-Time Warner, Pebble Steel, And Our Boss Kidnapped in Vegas

The mere mention of Comcast and Time Warner cuddling up to form one crummy super-conglomerate is enough to send you running for the pitchforks. But this unholy union—if it passes regulatory muster—goes deeper than MONOPOLY BAD.

Escape From Las Vegas: My Weekend Being Fake-Kidnapped in Sin City

Comcast-Time Warner, Pebble Steel, And Our Boss Kidnapped in VegasS

In the meeting room of a La Quinta hotel on the northernmost outskirts of Las Vegas, near the entrance to Nellis Air Force Base, the company OnPoint Tactical hosted the most recent iteration of their "Urban Escape & Evasion" course.

Pebble Steel Review: The Best Smartwatch, Now Also Beautiful

Comcast-Time Warner, Pebble Steel, And Our Boss Kidnapped in Vegas

Smartwatches are awesome! Smartwatches look kinda dumb a lot of the time! They don't have to though, and the Pebble Steel is proof. The improved look isn't quite enough to make it the perfect smartwatch, but it goes a long, long way.

This Genius Kinect Rig Puts You Inside a Video Game in Two Minutes Flat

What if, the next time you played a video game, the main character not only looked like you but had the same body, same clothes, same everything? How would it change the way you related to the game? How would it change the way you relate to the other characters in it? I found out.

How the Jacket Zipper Was Perfected After 100 Years

Comcast-Time Warner, Pebble Steel, And Our Boss Kidnapped in VegasS

You might've heard about Under Armour's crazy new zipper that only requires one hand to zip. Though the futuristic magnetic clasp jigsaws nicely with the company's high-performance standards, the zipper was originally had more humble origins: helping a sick man lead an easier life.

NYC's Touchscreen Subway Maps Are Finally Here, and They're Amazing

New York subway riders first were promised futuristic touchscreen wayfinding maps a year ago. But the plan to install the futuristic infrastructure stalled as the design team took a step back to improve the hardware. Six months overdue, the first batch is finally live in Grand Central Station. They were worth the wait.

What Are "Smart" Credit Cards, and Why Are They Coming to America?

Comcast-Time Warner, Pebble Steel, And Our Boss Kidnapped in VegasS

It only took the theft of 40 million Target customer credit card details to spur Congress into finally joining the rest of the world in abandoning the highly insecure credit cards you're used to. Starting late next year, every credit card in the United States will adopt a more secure system. Here's what it is, and how it works.

7 Simple Improvements That Perfected Everyday Products

Comcast-Time Warner, Pebble Steel, And Our Boss Kidnapped in VegasS

It's really hard to improve on a good thing. But every once in a while, a product you have known and loved for a very long time gets a redesign or a tweak that's genius in is simplicity. Here are seven examples of products that we took for granted, recently perfected by a tiny twist.

Frank Gehry Is Still the World's Worst Living Architect

Comcast-Time Warner, Pebble Steel, And Our Boss Kidnapped in VegasS

While it's been widely known for at least a decade that Frank Gehry is the world's worst living architect, it's not entirely clear why some people—mostly very rich clients—haven't picked up on this yet. The utterly god awful Biomuseo in Panama, an eco-discovery center that cost at least $60 million and took a decade to construct, is only the most recent case in point.

The World's Largest Solar Plant Started Creating Electricity Today

Comcast-Time Warner, Pebble Steel, And Our Boss Kidnapped in VegasS

Take 300,000 computer-controlled mirrors, each 7 feet high and 10 feet wide. Control them with computers to focus the Sun's light to the top of 459-foot towers, where water is turned into steam to power turbines. Bingo: you have the world's biggest solar power plant, the Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System.