Google Clone Makes It Easy to Search for Drugs and Guns on the Dark Web

It can be hard to find good smack without leaving the comfort of your own home. At least it used to be. A new search engine for black markets is making it easier than ever to find anything from high quality heroin to assault rifles. The site even looks just like Google. It's called Grams, and it works remarkably well.

You simply open up your Tor browser—it only works with Tor—navigate to grams7enufi7jmdl.onion, type in your sin, and in half a second you're presented with a buffet of options. There's even an "I'm Feeling Lucky" button. Yes, there's is now an "I'm Feeling Lucky" button for meth on the internet, albeit a buggy one. We tried to find some crystal quickly and were instead redirected to a search for "silencer." At least, there's a built in joke, there.

You can't blame Grams for being a little janky so far, though. It's the work of one man, who simply calls himself Gramsadmin. "I noticed on the forums and reddit people were constantly asking 'where to get product X?' and 'which market had product X?' or 'who had the best product X and was reliable and not a scam?'" he told Wired. "I wanted to make it easy for people to find things they wanted on the darknet and figure out who was a trustworthy vendor."

Google Clone Makes It Easy to Search for Drugs and Guns on the Dark Web

For now, Grams works with eight different black markets, including SilkRoad2, Pandora, and something called Nice Guy. Each of the markets have also given Grams explicit permission to scrape their sites for search data. Gramsadmin, who built the whole site in just two weeks, says he'll soon have a Google AdWords-like product as well that will let vendors promote their listings. He'd like to hire a programmer to help, but it turns out it's hard to find hackers you can trust.

Obviously, there's a lot about this new idea that's highly illegal, so who knows how long it'll stay up and running. If you've searching high and low trying to find an AR-15 with the serial numbers filed off, though, now's your chance. [Wired]