How Cities Sleep, Visualized

People in Melbourne get the most, those in Tokyo the least. No, get your mind out of the gutter: we're talking about sleep here, and how much of it the inhabitants of certain cities manage to actually get.

The Wall Street Journal has been playing with a new dataset released by Jawbone which tracks how people sleep across the entire world by grabbing data from UP wearables. It's a big enough data set ot fairly representatives (of UP wearers, at least)—and it makes for interesting viewing.

You can play with an interactive version of these over on the Wall Street Journal website or simply study the one above. Either way, you'll notice some interesting features, especially when you throw activity into the mix, too. Those in metropolitan areas like New York have a regimented regime: up early on weekdays, little activity during the working week, out late Friday and Saturday, sleeping in on the weekend, and mid-week evening workouts. Compare that to Orlando, and the difference is incredible—there, there's little distinction between days at all. Make of that what you will.

The Journal also looks at New York over the entire year, which is well worth looking at—especially the way that sleep schedules shift come the holidays. [WSJ]