How Much the Starship Enterprise Costs, Google I/O Goodies, And MoreS

It's been a big, big week. Google I/O hit this week, bringing along a whole bunch of Android updates, if not a new version or any actual hardware. And aside from all that jazz, we've got an ode to Chris Hadfield, (a wild guess at) how much it would cost to build the starship Enterprise, why 3D-printing is overrated, the best streaming radio service, why your ears pop on an airplane and more.

It was a simple 31-second clip, uploaded to YouTube in early January—a watch flopping weightlessly around its owner’s wrist, the first such video from Commander Chris Hadfield aboard the International Space Station. No explanation, no context, just metal links and a watch face swishing around a hairy Canadian arm like a tangled length of seaweed. This, and the dozens like it that would follow, is how Chris Hadfield became the most important astronaut in decades.

How Much the Starship Enterprise Costs, Google I/O Goodies, And MoreS

Flying sick was a bad choice. Your congested ears refuse to pop and now you're stuck on a cross-country flight, cruising at 30,000 feet of ear-splitting agony. Here's how to fix it.

Wrapping presents for Christmas or for someone's birthday is a pleasure in most cases. Wrapping luxury cars and towering trees and Space Shuttles, though, takes it to a whole new level.

Well, it's here at last, Google's annual orgy for developers and fanboys alike. Rumors have been flying, but we're about to find out what's what for real.

Google just dropped a metric ton of Google on us. Sorting through it all, it's clear that the company's not just trying to put new goodness into the world; it's trying to blow plenty of existing products and services out of the water. Here are all the things Google's looking to unseat and uppercut into the spike pit.

Larry Page, Google's CEO and co-founder, closed out the Google I/O keynote today with a sentimental, almost subdued speech. He didn't sound like a CEO. He sounded like a guy in charge of a company he genuinely thought could change the world. And it was a wonderful reminder that Google used to be, can be, and in many ways still is, so much more than a company.

One year ago, a team of researchers traveled deep into the Honduran rainforest in search of Ciudad Blanca, the legendary lost city of treasures. Yesterday, they revealed images—uncovered by lasers—of structures that they believe to be the White City itself.

Turning an online music service into a powerful automated DJ isn't easy. You can give an algorithm millions of songs and millions of data points, but it's still not going to have any style. So of all your options—including Google's new All Access—what's the streaming radio most worth your time? We found out.

Everyone's now aware of 3D printing — they’ve read about it in the papers, on blogs or seen it on TV. The mentality now seems to be that, in the future, we'll be able to download our products or make them ourselves with CAD programs, apps and 3D scanners, then just print them out, either at home, or in localised print shops. Which in turn will supposedly decentralize manufacturing, bringing it back to the West. But like the cupcake, Daft Punk’s latest album, or goji berries, 3D printing is severely overhyped — and I should know, because it’s what I do for a living.

So you want to build the Enterprise. Don't we all! Well good news: according to some quick, messy, napkin math, it's possible. Kind of. The bad news? It's going to be stupid expensive. But not unfathomably so! Start scrounging up your space-pennies.