Most Beautiful Items: September 27 - October 4, 2013

Need some beautiful things to gaze upon at the end of a long week? How about photos of the restoration of an 138-year-old Brooklyn bank? Or a lighting pavilion that looks like it's alive? Or a massive Lego calendar that syncs with your smartphone? These things and more wonders from the worlds of design, art, and architecture are the most beautiful items of the week.


This Responsive Lighting Pavilion Looks Like It's Alive

Most Beautiful Items: September 27 - October 4, 2013

This giant colorful honeycomb is called the SOL Dome. Made from thousands of interconnected fiber optics, the structure responds to its environment as if it were a living, breathing plant.


This Wall of Paper Pinwheels Turns Air Into Art

Most Beautiful Items: September 27 - October 4, 2013

Thousands of paper windmills seem to spin effortlessly in The Wind Portal, an installation by Lebanese artist Najla El Zein at London's V&A Museum this month. However, the production process wasn't exactly effortless. In fact, extreme accuracy was required to build this massive wall of wind, because it relies on…


The Latest Google Glass App We'd Actually Use: A Real-Life Color Picker

So we get that it's the perfect tool for capturing skydiving stunts, but as innovative as Google Glass seems, we're only slowly starting to see other ways it can be useful to the average user. And of all companies, paint maker Sherwin-Williams has come up with a rather clever use for the enhanced specs: as a real-life …


The Hidden History of the MLB Playoff Team Logos

Most Beautiful Items: September 27 - October 4, 2013

This afternoon, postseason baseball will commence as the Cardinals take the mound against the Pirates. But in a different time, it would have been the Brown Stockings versus the Alleghenys. Here's how they—and the other six playoff teams—got where they are today, as told by their ever-evolving logos.


The History of Knives, Forks and Spoons

Most Beautiful Items: September 27 - October 4, 2013

You use them every day. They're some of the most simple, but useful, devices in existence. They're used the world over. But who, exactly, invented knives, forks and spoons?


Inside Quirky's Ambitious Plan to Smarten Up Your Home

Most Beautiful Items: September 27 - October 4, 2013

When "invention machine" Quirky launched in 2009, it made a name for itself hocking plastic utensils and cord organizers—designed by you, for you. But over the past year, it's made a play to move into turning your home into a Jetsons-worthy utopia. And it's got the means—and brains—to do it.


This Giant Lego Calendar Syncs Automatically With Your Smartphone

Even though your schedule is constantly at your fingertips via smartphone, everyone gets a little off track every once in a while. So the creative studio Vitamins dreamt up a solution that bridges real-life and online schedules: A giant Lego calendar that syncs up with smartphones.


Tour the Restoration of a Grand 138-Year-Old Brooklyn Bank

Most Beautiful Items: September 27 - October 4, 2013

Odds are good that if you live in the area, you've walked by the the closed Williamsburgh Savings Bank and wondered what's inside. Located just over the Williamsburg Bridge, at 175 Broadway, in Brooklyn, New York, the Beaux-Arts sty building hails from a time when banks were grand, church-like spaces. And now, after…


Inside a Boeing Engineer's Impossibly Small Dream Pad

Steve Sauer, Seattle resident and Boeing aircraft interior designer, was simply looking for some storage space when he found the tiny room that would become his home. But at just 182 square feet, these DIY living quarters required a decade of work, countless hours of wrangling with city planners, and just about all of …


6 Cities and Towns That Were Relocated Completely

Most Beautiful Items: September 27 - October 4, 2013

Why is it so hard for us humans to let go? We're obsessed with preserving the things we love—even when logic tells us it's time to move on. One large scale example of this irrational behavior: The billions of dollars spent to move entire towns out of harm's way.