Work on Google's Mysterious Barge Mysteriously Halts

Work on Google's Mysterious Barge Mysteriously Halts

Following scrutiny from the Coast Guard and an investigation by the San Francisco Bay Conservation and Development Commission, work on Google's mysterious docked barge has stopped.

CNET reports that the barge has been covered in scaffolding and black netting ever since the Coast Guard stopped by for an inspection on October 23. Since then, nobody has been working at the site except for a lone security guard, giving enough reason to believe that the barge won't be up and running until at least spring 2014, when it's supposed to become some sort of traveling showroom for Google products. (It was supposed to be unveiled in November.) There's no word on what's happening with the East Coast barge being built in Portland, Maine.

But hey, what's a mystery barge good for if not extended an unrelenting mystery? [CNET]

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Pending approvalOriginal post by Jamie Condliffe on Gizmodo

This Is What Google's Barge Should Eventually Look Like

This Is What Google's Barge Should Eventually Look Like

While Google is still encouraging mystery about what will lurk within its barge, documents unearthed by the San Francisco Chronicle seem to suggest that its outside will end up rather more striking than at present.

The documents, filed with the Port of San Francisco by By and Large LLC, explain that the floating... thing will eventually be a 50-foot-tall, 250-foot-long structure made of recycled shipping containers, surrounded by sails resembling fish fins. Wait, fish fins?

Well, yeah, kinda. The image, also taken from the documents, is an artist's rendering of how it could turn out. Modern, certainly, and a little different from what's floating on the water right now.

Elsewhere, the documents explain that the barge will be used as a "studio" and "temporary technology exhibit space"—which fits with what we've heard before—and will will host up to 1,000 visitors a day during month-long residencies at mooring sites around San Francisco. But, exactly what is still happening inside? [SFGate via CNET via Verge]

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