The Self-Checkout Security Checkpoint Passed Its First Big Test

The Self-Checkout Security Checkpoint Passed Its First Big Test

Tiresome TSA security lines may be a thing of the past as a new, self-managed security device successfully passed its real world debut at an Australia-Spain World Cup match in Curitiba, Brazil last month. The only folks not excited about the new security measure are die hard fans of the Socceroos.

While the machine successfully filtered out traditionally dangerous items from being brought into the match, it also identified FIFA's stranger and more obscure prohibited items such as flagpoles, vuvuzelas, large bags of flour, and toy kangaroos. Sad for the Aussies, but great for anyone who's tired of invasive TSA practices. You can read more about the machine's gentler touch below. [Wired]http://gizmodo.com/self-checkout-...

Self-Checkout Security Checkpoints Could Replace Touchy TSA Agents

Self-checkout registers at the grocery store have reduced the lines when it comes to buying food, but can a similar setup do the same for security… Read…

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Pending approvalOriginal post by Andrew Liszewski on Gizmodo

Self-Checkout Security Checkpoints Could Replace Touchy TSA Agents

Self-checkout registers at the grocery store have reduced the lines when it comes to buying food, but can a similar setup do the same for security waiting lines? A company called Qylur has developed the Qylatron automated checkpoint which it hopes will bring added safety to sports or concert venues without increasing wait times to get inside.

Patrons place their bags and other personal belongings in a small compartment, and then walk through a traditional metal detector. On the other side their scanned items are waiting for them behind a locked door that's only accessible using their own unique ticket. This helps prevent theft, but if there's a problem, also allows the items in question to be locked down until they can be manually searched by a security officer.

Self-Checkout Security Checkpoints Could Replace Touchy TSA Agents

Qylur claims that up to five of the Qylatron checkpoints can be monitored by just a single operator, which also makes them more financially feasible for venues hoping to improve their security. And while they've been already tested at an airport in Rio de Janeiro, the capacity of those scanning compartments would have to be increased for larger hubs to accommodate carry-on luggage. But if it means reducing the number of disgruntled TSA agents we have to deal with, let's get these rolled out everywhere. [Qylur via PSFK]

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