Update from the Space Recruit

7 days left on the Space-Recruit trial period, so it's time for another update and shameless plea to come visit my astronomy/planetary science/geology/physical sciences subsite.

Good news: I've hit 300k US People!! Bad news: ...that's the running 30 cumulative total, and it needs to be a 30-day period from my start-date. Why, yes, there is always another rule to follow, isn't there? Good news again: I'm at 254k for May so far, which means I'll hit my target if I can keep up the 10k per day average. ...except that I don't actually have a nicely predictable pattern like that; instead I average 5k/day on weekdays, 20k/day on weekends. This American long-weekend is good for me!

Astrosurf by mebooky.

In the last preview of coming attractions, this week has:

  • cute creatures (Animals made his 300k, so cuteness is clearly a winning factor),
  • Stargate: Universe
  • dinosaurs without bones (including guest-ichnologist to answer your trace-fossil questions)
  • current events
  • a geology feature for the front page
  • morning eyecandy
  • diy science toy
  • ...and trying to clear out all those draft-articles into published stories

I've been having a blast, and learned a whole lot while writing over 300 articles in not-quite 300 days. As always, if you like what you're reading and want me to stay on as an io9 writer, please share out links from the subsite (on Kinja, but also on other social media platforms). Can't think of the best link to share? Here's a list of everything I wrote this week, or, hey, a list of everything I've written!

Space This Week

As always, a lot of things happened in astronomy and planetary sciences this week. Here's your weekly round-up of stories from my subsite, and anywhere else that was downright interesting.

It's my last week as a Space Recruit. My numbers are healthy, but I still haven't passed that critical 300k boundary for US People to stay on. Here's my stories from this week. See something you like? Pass it on and share the love!

As always, we can't cover it all, so here's some stories from around the web:

Image credit: NASA/Spitzer Space Telescope of Kappa Cassiopeiae (HD 2905) in infrared.