The Stubborn "Nail Houses" That Refuse to Get Demolished

In 1914, the government of New York City took ownership of a Manhattan apartment building belonging to one David Hess. The city used a legal power called eminent domain, allowing governments to seize private property for public use—in this case they wanted to expand the subway system. Hess fought them and lost, and… » 9/05/14 3:34pm 9/05/14 3:34pm

The City Pipes and Stairways That Get Left Behind and Lead to Nowhere

Cities, like living things, evolve slowly over time. Buildings and structures get added and renovated and removed, and in this process, bits and pieces that get left behind. Vestiges. Just as humans have tailbones and whales have pelvic bones, cities have doors that open into a limb-breaking drop, segments of fences… » 8/27/14 1:40pm 8/27/14 1:40pm

The Untold History of Where Barcodes Come From

When George Laurer goes to the grocery store, he doesn't tell the check-out people that he invented the barcode, but his wife used to point it out. "My husband here's the one who invented that barcode," she'd occasionally say. And the check-out people would look at him like, "you mean there was a time when we didn't… » 4/03/14 1:00pm 4/03/14 1:00pm

Cover Story: The Fascinating Anatomy of a Magazine Cover

You know the saying: you can't judge a book by its cover. With magazines, it's pretty much the opposite. The cover of a magazine is the unified identity for a whole host of ideas, authors, and designers who have created the eclectic array of stories and articles and materials within each issue. And, some would argue,… » 2/18/14 12:00pm 2/18/14 12:00pm