Pompeii's Ruins Are Being Wired Up By An "Electronic Warfare" Firm

The ruined city of Pompeii—its residents' bodies so famously and eerily preserved by the very volcanic ashes that fatally buried them nearly 2,000 years ago—has seen better days. With neither the budget nor the personnel to protect itself against invading hordes of international tourists, the city is at risk of damage, … » 4/08/14 10:40am 4/08/14 10:40am

The Fossilized Machines Humans Will Leave Behind

In the debut issue of a new journal called The Anthropocene Review, University of Leicester geologist Jan Zalasiewicz leads a team of five writers in discussing the gradual fossilization of human artifacts, including industrial machines, everyday objects, and even whole cities. They refer to these as "technofossils," and … » 3/31/14 12:20pm 3/31/14 12:20pm

These 10,000-Year-Old Instruments Are Playing Their First Modern Gig

Roughly ten millennia ago, musicians didn't lug amps or guitars around to their shows—they lugged lithophones, or instruments made of resonant rocks. The oldest lithophones ever found will be played in their first public concert next week in Paris. Sadly, it'll also be their last. » 3/17/14 2:20pm 3/17/14 2:20pm

Laser and Radar Let Researchers Peer Deep Inside Ancient Roman Bridges

Ancient stone bridges dot the Spanish hills. Some are still in use, and all play a part in defining the region's landscape and heritage. Now, researchers at Spain's University of Vigo can examine the inner structures of these bridges without disturbing a single stone, thanks to some incredibly powerful imaging… » 3/14/14 1:00pm 3/14/14 1:00pm

Three Dead Racehorses Are Being Moved to Make Way for L.A. Development

A group of USC archaeologists received an unusual request. Their services would be required to dig up several large mammals—but not the Ice Age fossils that dot the L.A. landscape. They needed to unearth three horses buried under a racetrack. » 3/12/14 7:20pm 3/12/14 7:20pm

If Stonehenge Is Actually a Giant Instrument, What Does It Sound Like?

We know that the rocks of Stonehenge were carried there from over 200 miles away, but we've never known why. Now, researchers say they believe it was for the special sonic qualities of a particular kind of stone—and that Stonehenge might have served as a bell-like instrument. » 3/09/14 4:00pm 3/09/14 4:00pm

Rio's Olympic Construction Crews Are Unearthing Its Slave Trade Past

Rio is currently pouring its energy into building stadiums, housing, and roads to host the World Cup next summer and the Olympics in 2016. But in the process, the city is uncovering relics of its past—including evidence of its one-time reign as the busiest slave port in the Americas. » 3/09/14 11:01am 3/09/14 11:01am

World's oldest cheese found on the chest of a 3,500-year-old mummy

There's nothing quite like a nice, aged cheese, but even the most adventurous cheese connoisseurs would be put off by a recent discovery from an an ancient Chinese tomb. Archaeologists uncovered perfectly preserved mummies whose chests were sprinkled with extra aged, 3,5000-year-old cheese—the world's oldest cheese by… » 2/27/14 10:58pm 2/27/14 10:58pm

A Visit to the Weirdest Archaeological Site in North America

In the desert two hours northeast of Los Angeles, just outside the town of Barstow, there is a peculiar little place called the Calico Early Man Site. If you've driven either direction, from L.A. to Las Vegas or back, you've probably seen the sign for it, mysteriously and without any real information implying that the… » 1/22/14 3:00pm 1/22/14 3:00pm

Did Unicorns Ever Exist?

On November 30, 2012, the Korean Central News Agency, North Korea's government "news" agency, reported that scientists had "reconfirmed" the existence and location of the final resting place of the unicorn ridden by King Dongmyeong, the founding father of Goguryeo of an ancient Korean kingdom. The unicorn's grave was… » 1/20/14 5:45am 1/20/14 5:45am

Archaeologists Discover Aztec Ritual Skulls Under Mexico City's Subway

Archaeologists in Mexico City made a grisly and awesome discovery this week, after a subway extension project uncovered a stretch of pre-Hispanic development—including four skulls that were once displayed on a broad rack of bones from sacrificial offerings. » 1/02/14 10:30am 1/02/14 10:30am