Is It Really Possible to Learn to Speed Read?

Ninety-five percent of college educated individuals read at a rate between 200-400 words per minute according to extensive research done by University of Massachusetts Amherst professor Dr. Keith Rayner. However, there exists a small, but rather vocal subset of people who insist that they can read several times faster… » 4/16/15 8:00am 4/16/15 8:00am

Why We Need a Right to Privacy for Brain Data

There's still no technology in the world that lets you listen in on someone's thoughts. But fMRI advances are making it easier than ever to measure, interpret, and even reconstruct brain activity, and a growing market of wearables with electroencephalographic (EEG) components and brain-computer interfaces means that… » 2/23/15 1:15pm 2/23/15 1:15pm

A New, Cutting-Edge Microscope Technique That Uses Diaper Absorbent

Up until now, most microscopy has operated on a pretty simple principle: Use tricks of light to make small things appear big. A group of MIT scientists, however, are trying something radically different. They've developed a technique that physically makes tiny neurons bigger, and yes, it uses a chemical commonly found… » 1/12/15 2:51pm 1/12/15 2:51pm

Why Is It That Zombies Eat Brains?

Zombies have been a pop culture staple for decades, and in that time the concept of the dead coming back to life somehow to feast on the living has proliferated virtually every form of media that exists. One trait that is seemingly synonymous with zombies is their apparent need to feed on the brains of the living. But… » 12/10/14 6:30am 12/10/14 6:30am

Scientists Have Located the Brain's On/Off Switch for Consciousness

Every one of us loses consciousness on a daily basis: it's called sleep. But scientists have never understood which part of the brain controls when you're conscious and when you're not. Now, researchers seem to have found it by coincidence while studying an epileptic patient—and used electronic brain stimulation to… » 7/06/14 9:00am 7/06/14 9:00am

Scientists Cured Paralysis in Mice with Stem Cells and Lasers

This is wild. Chasing the elusive dream of curing paralysis, a team of scientists used stem cells and optogenetics to circumvent the central motor system of lab mice whose nerves had been cut. This enabled them to blast individual motor neurons with a laser, triggering movement in the legs of the mice. » 4/03/14 6:45pm 4/03/14 6:45pm