These Maps Plot the Most Interesting Places and the Paths Between Them

For the past five years data artist Eric Fischer’s been working on something called the Geotaggers’ World Atlas, a project which hopes to discover the world’s most interesting places by examining beautiful Flickr photos. As it turns out, the maps showing the routes between them are just as beautiful. » 4/29/15 8:00pm Wednesday 8:00pm

Ask Your Questions About Finding and Mapping Lost Urban History

Los Angeles is no stranger to failed infrastructural schemes and vanished landscapes. But did you know that a nine-mile bike highway once traveled part of the way from LA to the nearby city of Pasadena? It’s one of 19 map-annotated essays about the city featured in the new book LAtitudes: An Angeleno’s Atlas. » 4/29/15 2:00pm Wednesday 2:00pm

A Smart Modular Roadway Could Ping Workers When It Needs To Be Replaced

Autonomous vehicles get all the glory in our ideal transportation future, but they’re gonna need somewhere to drive. Our streets are seriously lagging, technology-wise. Enter smart roadways that can alert crews when they need to be repaired—and then can be swapped out as easily as Lego bricks. » 4/28/15 5:00pm Tuesday 5:00pm

Lake Mead Is Now Lower Than Ever, But Vegas Has a Crazy Survival Plan

Yesterday, the surface of Lake Mead reached its lowest level since it was filled in 1937—1,080 feet above sea level. But engineers were prepared for this: A huge infrastructural project under the lake has been underway since 2008 to ensure that Vegas residents will still be able to get water, even as the drought… » 4/28/15 3:30pm Tuesday 3:30pm

An 1899 Plan to Build A Bike Highway in Los Angeles (And Why It Failed)

Over a century ago, the California Cycleway promised an elevated, dedicated bike path from Los Angeles to the nearby city of Pasadena. In this excerpt from the new book LAtitudes: An Angeleno’s Atlas, author Dan Koeppel tracks its path through Southern California—and discovers why it was never finished. » 4/27/15 4:35pm Monday 4:35pm

William Shatner Is Crowdsourcing Ideas for His Bonkers Drought Plan

Hey, we’ve all got ideas to save California from its cataclysmic drought. Stop fracking! Stop showering! Stop eating! But none of us is William Shatner: Enterprise captain, Priceline spokesperson, Twitter watchdog, and probably, definitely, most certainly not a water expert. This is not preventing him from proposing… » 4/24/15 12:15pm 4/24/15 12:15pm

Tesla's New Battery Could Solve One of Solar Power's Biggest Problems

So far, specific details are thin on the new battery designed for home use that Tesla’s announcing next week. But just based on what we do know, it’s a pretty big deal. The quest for a good battery that can store home-generated power is kind of like the holy grail for a renewable energy future. This one product might… » 4/23/15 9:45am 4/23/15 9:45am

The Secret History of the Most Famous Neon Sign in the World

Much like the I Heart NY logo or the Hollywood Sign, the sign welcoming visitors to Las Vegas was not meant as a grand gesture when it was conceived. What was a simple act of civic self promotion—an ad, really—became a piece of public art and eventually an icon in the public domain, plastered on fuzzy dice and shot… » 4/22/15 3:30pm 4/22/15 3:30pm

Why The Data On California's Biggest Water Hogs Isn't Public 

It might seem like all of California is busy naming scapegoats who consume unfair shares of water during the state’s historic drought. But there’s actually no way for the public to go after the state’s worst water wasters because there’s no way of knowing who they are. Legislation has ensured that much of the state’s… » 4/21/15 6:00pm 4/21/15 6:00pm

Here's What The World's Tallest Residential Building Will Look Like

The supertall race in Midtown Manhattan is marching skyward at an astonishing rate, with at least four towers on West 57th Street destined to be among the world’s tallest. Now we have some official-official images of the Nordstrom Tower, which, at 1,775 feet, will at some point be the tallest residential building on… » 4/20/15 6:00pm 4/20/15 6:00pm

7 Endangered Examples of the Most Hated Architectural Style Ever

It’s hard to find a more polarizing architecture—even among scholars it’s most likely to be described as “ugly,” “unloved,” or even “hated.” I’m talking about Brutalism, the blocky unfinished concrete style which used to be very common in cities around the world, but is now being demolished at an astounding rate. » 4/20/15 4:51pm 4/20/15 4:51pm

George Lucas Wants To Build Affordable Housing on His Skywalker Ranch

Having safely outsourced the Star Wars franchise, George Lucas can focus on his real estate projects. He’s got his museum in Chicago, and now, an affordable housing project proposed for his own Skywalker Ranch. Those who can’t afford San Francisco could live just over the Golden Gate Bridge in what’s otherwise one of… » 4/17/15 7:45pm 4/17/15 7:45pm

Does Preserving the Past Keep Cities From Moving Into the Future?

In the last 50 years, the preservationist movement has become powerful—maybe too powerful in a place like New York City, where a third of the buildings are now protected. But the buildings we think of today as landmarks inevitably replaced older structures, ones we tend to forget were demolished in the path towards… » 4/17/15 1:50pm 4/17/15 1:50pm

A day in the life of Singapore and Hong Kong

Hong Kong and Singapore are both bustling international cities of the future that, depending where you are in the city, can almost make you feel like you could be anywhere in the world. Here's a tour of both cities (or city-state, or special administrative region) in one. I love the split view looks at them. » 4/15/15 7:00pm 4/15/15 7:00pm