New NYC Tourism Ads Target Locals Too Lazy to Leave the Neighborhood

New York sometimes feels like an archipelago of multiple cities—cities which, unless you have a damn good reason like work or your friend's band, you rarely visit. So for its latest ad campaign, NYC isn't going after out-of-staters. It's going after the lazy ass locals who never visit any neighborhoods but their own. » 10/23/14 4:09pm Yesterday 4:09pm

Vertical Tsunami Shelters Will Help People Get to Higher Ground, Fast

The threat of a tsunami is a very real thing for much of the Pacific coastline, yet many cities in the U.S. haven't taken specific infrastructural measures to ensure their residents are safe when they happen. A new building in Washington will have the first purpose-built tsunami shelter in the country, offering… » 10/23/14 1:46pm Yesterday 1:46pm

China’s President Wants To Ban Weird Buildings—And That’s a Huge Mistake

From smog-chomping supercities to giant penis skyscrapers, China has built its reputation on wild and wacky structures of late. But in a public speech last week, China's president made a promise to his country: "No more weird architecture." No way! Here's why we need to Keep China Weird. » 10/21/14 5:17pm Tuesday 5:17pm

Washington DC's Very Own High Line Will Clean Its Dirty River Water

The Anacostia River that runs through Washington DC has historically been known as, well, not the cleanest river in the country. A new elevated park straddling the river plans to filter the dirty water with a waterfall feature (apparently projected with Frederick Douglass's face). It's the winning design announced… » 10/16/14 4:30pm 10/16/14 4:30pm

Zurich Installed 4,500 Street Sensors to Count Every Car in the City

Congestion pricing—the implementation of high tolls to keep cars out of congested downtown areas—is one of the most effective ways to reduce traffic and emissions. Zurich's plan goes above and beyond that, using a network of sensors to track the number of cars that enter its downtown and prevent more cars from… » 10/16/14 3:41pm 10/16/14 3:41pm

Saving This Sinking City Will Cost $40 Billion

Venice? Sure, it's sinking. So is Mexico City, Bangkok, and Ho Chi Minh City. But none of them are being submerged as fast as Jakarta, which is sinking as much as a few inches a year—for comparison's sake, Venice is sinking by .08 inches every year. Now, Jakarta is undertaking a three-decade-long plan to save its… » 10/15/14 3:36pm 10/15/14 3:36pm

Chicago was raised over 4 feet in the 19th century to build its sewer

In the middle of the 19th century, Chicago embarked on a quest to literally lift itself out of the mud. Water couldn't drain from the low-lying city, so its streets became impassable swamps. The most reasonable solution, Chicago decided, was just to raise the whole goddamn city by 4 to 14 feet. » 10/15/14 1:34pm 10/15/14 1:34pm

What Would Happen If the 20 Biggest US Cities Were Wiped Out With Nukes

Wiping out an American city, much less the largest ones, requires either blast yields well beyond the capability of any terrorist organization, or numbers of nuclear weapons that would make the terrorist organization one of the largest nuclear powers on the planet. This is particularly true of major cities such as… » 10/14/14 1:10pm 10/14/14 1:10pm

The 10 Best American Cities for Riding Transit To Work

We've seen plenty of stories that measure how big, fast, and effective our transit systems are in the U.S. But for many people, none of that matters unless transit can do one thing: Get them to work. That's why this study by the University of Minnesota is so valuable—it shows which transit systems provide the best… » 10/13/14 8:25pm 10/13/14 8:25pm

Brunch, Laser Balls, Columbus Day: What's Ruining Our Cities This Week

Columbus Day has been ruining America for a few decades now, but a few cities are finally doing something about it. A sunlight-refracting silver orb is being removed in Calgary after burning a hole in someone's jacket. And someone says that brunch is turning our neighbors into assholes. It's What's Ruining Our Cities! » 10/12/14 3:00pm 10/12/14 3:00pm

This Map Shows Manhattan Transform from the Countryside to a Metropolis

It's hard to imagine, but Manhattan used to be a bunch of open fields and trees. Then, after a small Dutch fort turned into an important trading post, things began to change. And a new map project by the architects and coders at Morphocode lets you visualize the past 300 years of that process. » 10/10/14 5:46pm 10/10/14 5:46pm

Explore the Largest Steam Pipe System in the World, Hidden Beneath NYC

In its latest adventure, New York Times' Living City series explores the city's enormous underground steam distribution system. Unlike anywhere in the world, New York hides away the largest steam system that powers all types of humidification sources, preserving museum art to even dishwashers in every restaurant… » 10/09/14 4:34pm 10/09/14 4:34pm