U-Boats, Spies, and White Magic: The Invention of Wireless Cryptography

The wireless telegraph station in Sayville, New York was one of the most powerful in the world. Constructed by the German company Telefunken in 1912, it served as a transatlantic relay point for diplomatic messages and business communications. It was a beacon among amateur wireless enthusiasts around the United… » 7/11/14 3:43pm Yesterday 3:43pm

The NSA Hated Civilian Encrypted Data Way Back in the 1970s

In the 1970s, civilian researchers at places like IBM, Stanford and MIT were developing encryption to ensure that digital data sent between businesses, academics and private citizens couldn't be intercepted and understood by a third party. This concerned folks in the U.S. intelligence community who didn't want to get… » 7/24/13 3:01pm 7/24/13 3:01pm

Turing's Nazi Enigma Code-Breaking Secrets Have Been Declassified

Over 70 years ago, father of computer science Alan Turing developed the techniques which enabled quick and efficient decryption of the Nazis' Enigma-scrambled messages. Now, the secrets behind his techniques—hidden away in research documents since the Second World War—have been declassified. » 4/23/12 7:40am 4/23/12 7:40am

Quantum Encryption Network Goes Live, Claims To Be Unbreakable

Scientists have connected up the world's first computer network protected by “quantum cryptography,” a supposedly unbreakable system that functions off a scheme based on the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle. For us non-science folk, that means that you can't grab information transmitted through the network without… » 10/09/08 11:00pm 10/09/08 11:00pm