A Fan Stitched Together the Best Selfie of Curiosity Yet  

Behold Kevin Gill’s mosaic image of NASA’s Mars rover, which is just as good as the official selfies of Curiosity. The Nashua, NH, software engineer stitched together dozens of high-resolution photos taken by the MAHLI (Mars Hand Lens Imager) camera of the rover, and the result is a stunning self portrait of the… »8/10/15 10:33am8/10/15 10:33am

The first alien sounds of Mars are so damn spooky

This is a great video that shows the entire trip of the Mars Opportunity Rover on one side while tracking the trip on the red planet on the other. It’s cool to know where Curiosity has gone and what it has seen but perhaps the craziest thing of the video is hearing the noise of the planet. It’s just so damn freaky. »7/15/15 9:45am7/15/15 9:45am

Check out the new (and coolest) Mars Curiosity panorama selfie

Bravo NASA f0r capturing this new cool Mars Curiosity selfie on the surface of Mars at its new research site, the Mojave. NASA made this image by combining dozens of photos taken during January 2015. Here is the annotated version, so you can see the sites that the rover visited before reaching this point. »2/25/15 12:01am2/25/15 12:01am

Humans' Inherent Curiosity Stems From a Long, Protracted Childhood

Curiosity is one of our most basic traits and we have a lot to thank for it. Without the primal urge to always want to see what lies over the next hill, or the other the ocean, or beyond the confines of our atmosphere, humans would still be living—quite literally—in the stone age. In Curious: The Desire to Know and… »10/24/14 4:30pm10/24/14 4:30pm

At last, Mars Curiosity finally reaches its destination

This is it. Curiosity has reached its prime destination. After a brilliant conception, an amazing landing, and two years of continuous travel, the rover is now at the base of Aeolis Mons—aka Mount Sharp—a mountain that rises 18,000 feet (5.5 kilometers) at the center of Gale Crater. This is where the real fun begins. »9/11/14 2:54pm9/11/14 2:54pm

Why has Curiosity slowed down its course during its first Mars year?

The Mars Curiosity Rover has completed its first Mars year in the Red Planet—687 Earth days exploring and drilling on its way to its first destination—Murray Buttes. Overall, it's been a Mars year full of successes, even if we haven't found proof of life in Mars yet. But the rover has slowed down significantly. Why? »6/24/14 10:05pm6/24/14 10:05pm

Hey look a weird bright light was spotted on Mars

Do you see it? There's a little beacon of light in the photograph of Mars above. It's on the left side of the photo and it's pretty darn bright. What could it be? More importantly, what do we want it to be? A Martian signal keeping track of the Curiosity rover? An alien laser beam? A key to a secret portal in the… »4/09/14 12:03am4/09/14 12:03am