Can We Turn Stem Cells Into Eggs?  

Northeastern University biologist Jonathan Tilly is certain he’s found egg-making stem cells in adult mice. If he’s right, it would refute decades-old work that showed female mammals finish making all their eggs before or shortly after birth. This might make it possible to grow new eggs inside the ovaries of older… »11/09/15 3:00pm11/09/15 3:00pm

Salt Lake City Wants to Put Buildings In the Medians of Its Extra-Wide Streets 

A few months ago I wrote about a proposal to fix the housing crisis in San Francisco by building skinny apartments in the medians of its streets. Little did I know this idea was already being prototyped in a place that has even bigger streets than San Francisco, due to the unique way it was built. »10/12/15 5:00pm10/12/15 5:00pm

Testosterone in the Womb Affects How Our Faces Look After Puberty

Hormone surges at puberty trigger a lot of physical changes in both men and women, morphing child-bodies into adult forms. Genitals, hips, and muscle mass change, obviously–but so do faces. A new study suggests those facial changes are primed to happen by the presence of testosterone in utero. »9/29/15 5:26pm9/29/15 5:26pm

How Low-Tech Farming Innovation Can Make African Farmers Climate-Resilient

Scientists, politicians and the Pope are not the only ones calling for action on climate change these days. Farmers are observing changes in rainfall, temperature and other patterns in weather that have spurred them into shifting their farming methods. In fact, while climate change is not a source of scientific… »9/22/15 3:30am9/22/15 3:30am

Women Really Don't Notice Details About Your Penis

We’ve seen it in study after study: men worry about what their penis looks like. Is it too short? Too long? Too thin? Is the glans too fat? Will that birthmark be a deal breaker? Relax. A study published in the Journal of Sexual Medicine last month suggests that women don’t really notice those details.
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About one out of every 20,000 people born with male genitalia has two X chromosomes.

About one out of every 20,000 people born with male genitalia has two X chromosomes. One X holds an SRY gene, which induces male development in mammalian embryos and is normally found on the Y chromosome. In a fascinating article at Smithsonian, Viviane Callier explains how SRY can make the jump from Y to X. »7/21/15 10:40am7/21/15 10:40am

"Virgin Births" Won't Save The Smalltooth Sawfish From Extinction

The critically endangered smalltooth sawfish was recently found to be capable of asexual reproduction. It’s an exciting discovery for many reasons, but breathless claims by the media that sawfish could save their species from extinction by resorting to virgin births are wrong, wrong, wrong. Let’s explore why. »6/18/15 7:10pm6/18/15 7:10pm