Get Lost in the Swirling Green Seas of a Massive Algae Bloom

The summer of 2015 will probably be remembered as one of fire, drought, and hot, hot weather. But it’s also been a summer of frightfully voracious, microscopic life forms. From Lake Erie to the North Atlantic, tiny green algae are multiplying like crazy. And there’s no better way to appreciate the sheer immensity of… »9/05/15 7:00pm9/05/15 7:00pm

Here's Your World Today, Explained

The most famous image of Earth is one taken by the crew of Apollo 17 on their way to the Moon in 1972. Not only is it a beautiful picture, but it was the first time many people had ever seen an actual photo of our full planet. Fast forward a few decades, and we can see that view every day. Here’s your world today—as… »8/15/15 12:45pm8/15/15 12:45pm

Watch the Moon cross the face of the Earth in this incredible video

Here’s an absolutely stunning video that shows our Moon fly by and cross the face of our Earth. The detail is incredible, the size difference is dramatic, and it’s just lovely to see the phenomenon happen from outside Earth. We see the Moon streak the sky every night, this is what it looks like from space. »8/05/15 10:32pm8/05/15 10:32pm

Machines Sensed the Nepal Earthquake from 8,000 Miles Away

When a massive earthquake struck Nepal on April 25, it created seismic waves that traveled around the world in a matter of minutes, propagating swiftly through Earth’s crust and mantle to rattle seismic stations in the US. The Nepal quake was devastating, but the fact that it was felt 8,000 miles away is actually not… »5/04/15 1:15pm5/04/15 1:15pm

Two Leading Biologists Discuss The Next Step In Saving The Planet


Edward O. Wilson made his name by arguing that human society and the natural world are governed by the same principles. Sean B. Carroll made his name by unifying the study of humans and animals, showing that development in both is driven by the same fundamental molecular and genetic processes. »5/02/15 3:40pm5/02/15 3:40pm

Watch different layers of clouds move in completely different directions

This is cool. A time lapse, aptly named Highway in the Sky by the guy who filmed it, shows how different layers of clouds in the same sky can actually move in completely different directions. It's like seeing clouds respect different flows of traffic. It's like seeing multiple skies in one. It's like staring at a… »2/13/15 9:51pm2/13/15 9:51pm