The Planet Is Losing Groundwater at an Alarming Rate

When it comes to water scarcity, the loss of groundwater is like the silent killer: It isn’t as easy to measure or monitor as, say, a shrinking reservoir. We’ve known that many aquifers are overtaxed, but a new report shows we’re draining major aquifers faster than they’re being replenished. Not just in… » 6/26/15 9:20am 6/26/15 9:20am

40 Years of Bad Science: How Jaws Got Everything Wrong About Sharks

To celebrate the 40th anniversary of its original release, Jaws will be shown on the big screen once more on June 21st. Few other movies have cast such a long shadow into the “real” world as the first summer blockbuster. As a marine biologist whose research focuses on shark conservation, I’ve been living in that… » 6/19/15 10:00am 6/19/15 10:00am

How This Simple Landscaping Project Quiets an Airport's Roar

Two years ago in the Netherlands, artist Paul de Kort designed an 81-acre park near Amsterdam’s Schiphol Airport. His assignment? To use nothing but landscaping to dampen the noise of airplanes. Such a project had never been attempted—and a crucial element of the design was discovered almost by accident. » 6/17/15 10:07am 6/17/15 10:07am

"Ya Ever Feel Like Galileo?" Highlights from a U.S. Climate Hearing

This is one of the greatest/saddest highlight reels I’ve ever seen from a U.S. government hearing on climate change. Last week, the Committee on National Resources got experts and politicians together to explore whether climate change and carbon emissions should be considered “environmental impacts” in federal… » 5/21/15 11:15am 5/21/15 11:15am

Here's What Sharks Do When You Give Them Cameras

Fisheries biologist John Shepherd once said that “counting fish is like counting trees—except you can’t see them and they move.” This can make animal behavior research extremely difficult. And while increasingly advanced electronic telemetry tags can tell us a lot, there’s just no substitute for seeing a behavior on… » 5/20/15 11:10am 5/20/15 11:10am

The US Is Testing a Storm Surge Warning System for Hurricanes

The wall of wind-driven ocean that accompanies a hurricane is called a “surge” for a reason: This isn’t a gentle rising of the water level, it’s violent and destructive—sometimes more so than the hurricane’s winds. This hurricane season, for the first time, the National Hurricane Center will be testing a prototype… » 5/19/15 8:00pm 5/19/15 8:00pm

Learning From Australia's Drought Lessons to Avoid a Mad Max Future

The drought is no longer a California problem. The Colorado River, which supplies water to one-eighth of the country’s population, is reporting record low water levels due to overallocation. The US needs a little perspective when it comes to how bad this is going to get. Luckily we have one: Australia. » 5/15/15 12:00pm 5/15/15 12:00pm