Trust Us, Change Your Yosemite Font From Helvetica to San Francisco

Brittle, anemic Helvetica is simply not a good choice as a default display font for Apple's operating system. That's why I'm pretty excited about this little trick to replace Helvetica Neue (the standard font that comes with Yosemite) with San Francisco, Apple's new typeface designed in-house for the Apple Watch. » 12/08/14 5:20pm 12/08/14 5:20pm

3 Clever Typefaces That Solve Every Day Problems

Humans have been writing for a long, long time—we were making lettermarks for thousands of years. Of course, that doesn't mean we've ever reached a consensus about the perfect way to write or print. And over the past few years, we've seen designers take on real, tangible problems using type design. » 11/13/14 9:41am 11/13/14 9:41am

Why Sweden Commissioned Its Own Typeface

The idea of branding a place is a fairly new one, and the notion of place-based typefaces is even newer, with national and local governments from Qatar to Chattanooga commissioning their own fonts. The latest country to set its on typeface is Sweden—but it's also questioning whether a national font is a bit too… » 10/23/14 12:35pm 10/23/14 12:35pm

An Artist Perfectly Trolls Designers With a Comic Sans Typewriter

The easiest way to troll a pixel-pushing friend is to ensure you exclusively use Comic Sans for every email, message, and homemade birthday card you send them. Graphic designers hate the font, but the rest of the world still seems to enjoy its sense of whimsy, which is what inspired artist Jesse England to hack a… » 10/15/14 2:35pm 10/15/14 2:35pm

Watch an adorable 2-year-old girl immediately identify fonts adorably

I learned two things while watching this aww-inducing video. Scarlett, the cute 2-year-old girl in the video, is a genius child with an eagle eye for instantly recognizing typefaces better than most humans and that it's going to be awesome to be a parent because you can teach your kid whatever the heck you want them… » 9/11/14 8:55pm 9/11/14 8:55pm

Where the Dollar Sign Comes From

This symbol first showed up in the 1770s, appearing in documents of English-Americans who had business dealings with Spanish-Americans. However, it wasn't until the very early 1800s that it became popularized, around the same time as the first official U.S. dollars were being minted. Previous to this, the symbol had… » 6/24/14 7:00am 6/24/14 7:00am

9 Crazy 3D Typefaces Made From Everyday Objects

Whether we realize it or not, the fonts we interact with on a daily basis can be wildly impactful in some pretty surprising ways. These everyday fonts blend in so seamlessly with the world around us, though, that we hardly even notice them. So instead, what would happen if we tried blending our world into the fonts… » 6/13/14 9:20am 6/13/14 9:20am

Bic Is Trying To Make a Font Based on All the World's Handwriting

In yet another crushing blow to Comic Sans, pen-maker Bic is currently soliciting handwriting samples from anyone on Earth who wants to participate in its Universal Typeface Experiment. The goal is to create a universal font that will presumably supplant Comic Sans as the go-to typeface for amateur designers making… » 6/11/14 3:00pm 6/11/14 3:00pm

An Intricate Typeface Made Out of History's Greatest Inventions

When she was a design student, Khyati Trehan embarked on an ambitious project to highlight history's 26 most influential inventors with a unique alphabet. Remarkably, each letter of the special typeface is drawn with a world-changing invention while also name-checking the inventor. The letter "E," for instance, is… » 5/12/14 3:25pm 5/12/14 3:25pm

The Man Who Designed Verdana and Georgia Describes a Life Making Fonts

Read a magazine, book or website and you'll see the product of Matthew Carter's labors all over it—because he's the guy who designed hundreds of fonts, including Verdana and Georgia. In this video, he describes the interaction between technology and design in the creation of typefaces. » 4/21/14 6:00am 4/21/14 6:00am

The Government Would Save $400 Million If It Just Switched Typefaces

Of the many schemes to make the government more efficient, this is probably the only one that involves typography. A middle schooler in Pittsburgh has calculated that by simply switching the typeface used in government documents from Times New Roman to Garamond, it would save taxpayers $400 million in ink. » 3/28/14 4:00pm 3/28/14 4:00pm