Who Should Really Decide Net Neutrality's Fate?

Tim Wu, the guy who coined the phrase "net neutrality," went nose-to-nose with the House Judiciary subcommittee on Friday morning to fight for the future of the internet. Congress wants to know if somebody other than the FCC should decide the fate of net neutrality. Wu, for one, thinks that's a pretty silly idea. » 6/20/14 1:20pm 6/20/14 1:20pm

This Is How the FTC Wants Us to Save Ourselves From Obnoxious Robocalls

Way back in October, the Federal Trade Commission admitted impotence against the ever-tenacious robocall and essentially begged the nation to find some way to make the madness stop. With a cool $50,000 tossed in to sweeten the deal, two winners have, at last, surfaced: meet Nomorobo and the decidedly less catchy… » 4/02/13 1:14pm 4/02/13 1:14pm

How the FTC Screwed Up the Google Investigation (and Screwed You In the…

The FTC's reported closing of its Google search bias investigation, with no real enforceable settlement mechanism, and a special new self-enforcement antitrust precedent apparently only available to Google, raises serious questions about the integrity of the FTC's law enforcement process and whether the FTC accords… » 1/03/13 2:29pm 1/03/13 2:29pm

Judge Approves FTC's Largest Ever Fine, To Be Paid By Google

Nine months on from the Wall Street Journal spotting a massive Google privacy issue—namely, that it was circumventing cookie privacy settings in Safari—the search giant's fate is now sealed. A judge has approved the FTC's largest ever fine, in the process rejecting appeals from a consumer-rights group that the sum… » 11/19/12 4:17am 11/19/12 4:17am

FTC Lets Facebook Off the Hook With No Fines for Repeatedly Deceiving…

The FTC has accepted a settlement over its allegation that it repeatedly misled its users about privacy. Facebook was accused of telling users they could keep their information private and then repeatedly disclosing it anyway. Facebook won't take a fine for the privacy violations. Sigh » 8/10/12 12:05pm 8/10/12 12:05pm