Your Touchscreen Usage Is So Unique It Can Be Used as a Password

It turns out that your seemingly random taps, swipes, and other finger gestures on a touchscreen display might not be so random after all. In fact, the way you interact with a touchscreen is so unique that researchers at Georgia Tech have successfully created software that can lock down your tablet if someone else… » 4/17/14 1:20pm 4/17/14 1:20pm

MacGyver Bot Learns To Repurpose Random Objects as Tools

The robots in use around the world today are built for very specific purposes. Industrial arms can assemble cars, and Roomba can vacuum your home. But researchers at Georgia Tech hope that one day they could do more, to the point of using other tools and objects to handle any number of tasks. Like a cyborg version of… » 10/09/12 6:40pm 10/09/12 6:40pm

Autonomous Robots: Ethical Combatants or Suicide Bombers?

UK robotics professor Noel Sharkey is raising a fuss over the US Defense Department's intention to put $4 billion into "unmanned systems" in the next year or two. One fear is that spillover from all that R&D will give terrorists new ways to build effective GPS-guided suicide bombers for $500 or less. » 2/27/08 12:25pm 2/27/08 12:25pm

Georgia Tech to Launch First Interdisciplinary Robotics Ph.D Program

Georgia Tech is going to create the nation's interdisciplinary Ph.D program in Robotics, pulling from various engineering (mechanical, electrical, biomedical, aerospace) and computer science disciplines to form a more focused program. Other schools tend to offer a concentrated look at one area of robotics. The idea… » 2/02/08 8:00pm 2/02/08 8:00pm

New Air-Sampler Gadget Looks for Asthma Attack Triggers

Asthma attacks can come out of nowhere, or so it would seem. A new portable system is trying to predict asthma attacks by sampling the air and identifying likely triggers. The 1-lb. device, designed by a team at Georgia Tech, takes samples every two minutes, looking at recorded air temperature and humidity, and… » 1/28/08 9:41am 1/28/08 9:41am

IBM, Georgia Tech To Announce World's Fastest Microchip: 500GHz

Think your dual core 3-GHz processor is the bee's knees? IBM and Georgia Tech will more than likely make you cry today with their expected announcement of a silicon-based microchip that runs at 500GHz, a world record. No, not 50GHz, but 500GHz. This feat is accomplished because researchers essentially froze the… » 6/20/06 10:58am 6/20/06 10:58am