The Theft and Half-Century Journey of Einstein’s Brain

On April 17, 1955, the greatest scientist of his generation checked himself into Princeton Hospital due to chest pains. By early the next morning, Albert Einstein had died from an abdominal aortic aneurysm – the rupture of the aorta, the heart vessel that's the body's main supplier of blood. While word was still… » 1/30/15 6:42am 12 minutes ago

Inside the Bunker Where Soviets Kept Their Secret Stash of Nukes 

During the Cold War, Hungary was one of the westernmost allies of the Soviet Union. As a member of the Warsaw Pact, Hungary had to station a significant number of Soviet troops and military equipment on its territory. Now we've gone inside one of their most classified bases, and taken pictures. » 1/29/15 8:00pm Yesterday 8:00pm

All the faces of Ultron: The design evolution of the Avengers' archenemy

Outstanding illustration of the new Ultron on the cover of Empire this week. I remember how fascinated I was the first time I saw Ultron in Avengers. It was issue #162, published in 1977—I saw it much later because it arrived to Spain in the 80s. Here's how artists changed Ultron's appearance through the years: » 1/26/15 7:14pm Monday 7:14pm

Giant Circular Panorama Recreates The Hell of Fire-bombed Dresden

Seventy years ago, in one of the most controversial actions of World War Two, the British Royal Air Force (RAF) and the United States Army Air Forces (USAAF) dropped circa 4000 tons of high-explosive bombs and incendiary devices on Dresden. Only months before the end of World War II, in four fierce raids between 13… » 1/26/15 6:10pm Monday 6:10pm

Alan Turing's Hidden Manuscripts Are Up For Auction

Alan Turing was a British mathematician who both broke the infamous Enigma code, enabling Britain to stay alive during WWII, and also the father of computer science and artificial intelligence. He's the reason why people have laboured for decades to beat the 'Turing Test', and also the reason why submarines didn't… » 1/24/15 2:00pm Saturday 2:00pm

The 10 Greatest Tank Battles In Military History

Ever since the first armored vehicles crawled across the tortured battlescapes of World War I, tanks have become an indelible fixture of land warfare. Many tank-on-tank engagements have occurred over the years, some more significant — and epic — than others. Here are 10 you need to know about. » 1/23/15 1:49pm 1/23/15 1:49pm

Oregon Was Founded As a Racist Utopia

When Oregon was granted statehood in 1859, it was the only state in the Union admitted with a constitution that forbade black people from living, working, or owning property there. It was illegal for black people even to move to the state until 1926. Oregon's founding is part of the forgotten history of racism in the… » 1/21/15 10:00am 1/21/15 10:00am

A Brief History of the Rubber Band

Cheap, reliable, and strong, the rubber band is one of the world's most ubiquitous products. It holds papers together, prevents long hair from falling in a face, acts as a reminder around a wrist, is a playful weapon in a pinch, and provides a way to easily castrating baby male livestock… While rubber itself has been… » 1/20/15 7:36am 1/20/15 7:36am

Sift Through Hundreds of Images by Legendary Photographer Robert Frank

Robert Frank forever changed the course of photography when his book The Americans was published in 1958, chronicling the broad landscape of life in the USA. To say that Frank has reached legend status is an understatement. Now, with a new online collection put together by the National Gallery of Art, hundreds of … » 1/14/15 3:27pm 1/14/15 3:27pm

The Contraptions That Made Photographic Images Before Cameras Existed

You're probably familiar with the beginnings of photography. The daguerreotype, early black and whites, sepia-tone—and it all gets more colorful from there. But what about before photography? When there was no capture medium or lenses and everything was based on linear perspective? How did these early artists capture… » 1/05/15 12:15pm 1/05/15 12:15pm

A Brief History of the Movie Rating System

When you were a kid, sneaking into a rated R movie was a big deal. Everyone had their own tricks, but this author's was to buy a ticket to a rated G Disney movie, say, Mulan; when the usher turned their back, I would run into a rated R movie like, for example American History X. But it wasn't always this way – not… » 12/30/14 8:00am 12/30/14 8:00am

The Real Story Behind the 1914 Christmas Truce in World War I

It was 100 years ago this very night that something miraculous happened along the Western Front. After months of bitter fighting, soldiers on both sides gathered in no-man's-land in a spontaneous show of peace and goodwill. Here's what happened on that historic day — and why it marked the end of an era. » 12/25/14 8:34am 12/25/14 8:34am

The Strange Medieval Origins of Modern Logos 

When we think of early logos, we think of 19th and 20th century classics like Levi's or Coke. But the origins of logos and trademarks go back way further than that—back thousands of years, when merchants and craftspeople used "merchant's marks" to designate the origins of goods and their authors. » 12/19/14 11:00am 12/19/14 11:00am

Will Google Sell All Your Emails to Your Grandchildren?

In 40 years will Google, Facebook and Visa sell all your emails, photos, and purchase history to your grandchildren? The Sony hack has reminded us that nearly everything we say and do here in the early 21st century will be on the record forever. And we better be prepared for the historians of tomorrow to pick through… » 12/12/14 1:53pm 12/12/14 1:53pm