Can the indestructible hockey puck survive the endless fire of thermite?

The strongest material on Earth, fictional substances included, is a hockey puck. It’s true. After surviving against the red hot nickel ball and going toe to toe with liquid nitrogen, it totally edges out adamantium and whatever T-1000 was made out of. Here’s another battle that it holds up admirably to: thermite,… » 6/17/15 11:59am 6/17/15 11:59am

Indestructible hockey puck survives liquid nitrogen and hot nickel ball

Boom... and nothing. A hockey puck doesn’t break when you freeze it in liquid nitrogen and then smash it with a hammer or drop an 80 pound weight on it. But that’s because hockey pucks are meant for the cold, right!? Well, even if you go the opposite way and try to torch it with the vaunted red hot nickel ball, the… » 6/10/15 11:43pm 6/10/15 11:43pm

Watch a master optician work at his craft

A master optician sounds like some form of wizardry but that’s basically what Peter Thelin, master optician at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, is. He can make telescopes and microscopes and pretty much turn and shape and hand-polish any and all optical materials in his lab. It’s fun to hear him talk about his… » 5/15/15 1:27am 5/15/15 1:27am

Blackboard Chalk Isn’t Really Chalk at All

Ubiquitous in many classrooms since the 19th century, chalk and chalkboards are familiar to most of us. White, powdery and prone to sticking to those surfaces where it is put (and just as easy to wipe away), chalk and its accompanying board are excellent instructional aids. Notably, however, most chalk today isn’t… » 5/04/15 3:31am 5/04/15 3:31am