This Is Why Glowing Jellyfish Proteins Have Revolutionized Medicine

In his new book Illuminating Disease, chemist Marc Zimmer explains how fluorescent proteins have changed science. Taken from glowing jellyfish, these proteins are now one of the most important tools in medicine, used in everything from brain mapping to disease research. And yes, that is a GMO glowing chicken. » 1/26/15 4:20pm Yesterday 4:20pm

This Ingestible Microbot Is Powered By Stomach Acid 

There's tiny revolution afoot in medicine, where micro- and nano-sized robots will someday cruise around inside our bodies, zeroing in on cancerous cells or repairing damaged but otherwise healthy ones. But before those ideas all become reality, those bots need a power source inside our bodies. That power source could… » 1/19/15 4:45pm 1/19/15 4:45pm

GE's "Point and Shoot" Microscope Snaps Spectacular Cellular Shots

The microscopic worlds contained within a droplet of water are just as fascinating—and just as inaccessible to humans—as the farthest reaches of space. But the universe of the very small is now a little closer thanks to a highly-automated, cell counting microscope-camera hybrid from GE. » 1/14/15 11:40am 1/14/15 11:40am

Awesome GIFs of Our Insides Made By GE's Superfast New CT Scanner 

In September, Florida's West Kendall Baptist Hospital got a very cool (and very important) new tool: The very first "superfast" body scanner designed by scientists at GE. The team at West Kendall just wrapped up a study of the machine—and the images and GIFs that resulted are wild. » 1/12/15 9:16am 1/12/15 9:16am

We Found a New Antibiotic, And Better Yet, a New Way to Find Antibiotics

Amidst the onslaught of bad news about antibiotic resistance, here is something good: Scientists have found a new class of antibiotics in soil bacteria, one whose mechanism could make it particularly resistant to resistance. More significant than this single new antibiotic, though, is how scientists found it. » 1/07/15 2:55pm 1/07/15 2:55pm

The Best Vacuum Add-On Is the One That Saves You From Choking to Death

As news stories about elderly Japanese people choking on the sticky rice dish, mochi, have wormed their way into our post-New Year's consciousness next to hangovers and Twilight Zone marathons, it was only a matter of time before our gadgets started catching up. Now, a simple vacuum attachment wants to get shoved down… » 1/07/15 11:54am 1/07/15 11:54am

Smartphone Cameras Could Help Diagnose Ear Infections Right at Home

Ear infections, the number one reason parents take kids to the doctor, are an exceedingly common and exceedingly annoying fact of life. But a new smartphone app and accessory could help ease the irritation (of going to to the doctor's on a false alarm) by promising to diagnose ear infections right from home. » 12/18/14 11:30am 12/18/14 11:30am

A Scientific Defense of Santa's Weight

"Santa's behaviour and public image are at odds with contemporary accepted public health messages," argues a British Medical Journal editorial written by Dr. Scrooge and colleagues. Given Santa's tremendous popularity, particularly among children, the authors of the editorial argue the public should become aware of… » 12/18/14 6:30am 12/18/14 6:30am

The Flu Shot Isn’t a Good Match This Year. Is It Ever?

The CDC announced recently that this year's flu vaccine is missing a key strain, one that accounts for 48% of what's circulating. That strain, a "drifted" version of H3N2, was discovered in March 2014, but the vaccine strains for the Northern hemisphere, including the US, had been decided a month earlier. (The… » 12/16/14 5:15am 12/16/14 5:15am

Cows With Human Chromosomes Can Now Make Human Antibodies 

Cows are big hulking creatures—not so great for tipping over while drunk, but great for turning into living factories that make massive quantities of antibodies. Scientists have inserted a modified human chromosome to cows that can now make human antibodies for hantavirus. Other deadly disease like Ebola and MERS… » 11/26/14 7:00pm 11/26/14 7:00pm