How This Bug-Inspired Compound Eye Could Transform Missile Seeker Tech

The USAF is working on a fly-like artificial compound eye that could one day be used for seekers on missiles as well as other targeting systems. This is hardly the first time the DoD has looked to mother nature for good ideas, but compound eye technology has the potential to greatly increase the field of view and… » 3/11/15 1:46pm 3/11/15 1:46pm

These Guided Smart Shells Could Revolutionize The Navy's Dated Deck Guns

Raytheon's 155mm M982 Excalibur extended-range guided artillery shell is being shrunk down to fit into the Mark 45 five inch deck guns that are deployed aboard the Navy's Cruisers and Destroyers. This miniaturized sea-going Excalibur, known as the N5, could triple the range of current five inch shells and offer… » 2/24/15 3:48pm 2/24/15 3:48pm

How Dumb Cluster Bombs Are Becoming Heinously Smart

Cluster bombs have a bad rep and for good reasons. Yet, the cluster bomb concept has evolved from the dumbest of dumb bombs into a more targeted and discriminating weapon. One of these new cluster munitions in particular is incredibly complicated, heinously smart and ridiculously effective. They call it the Sensor… » 12/29/14 4:50pm 12/29/14 4:50pm

America's Omnidirectional Landmines Are (Somehow) Totally Legal

15,000 to 20,000 people—predominantly women, children, and the elderly—die from landmines every year. These explosive man-traps have been used in every major military conflict since 1938 and some 110 million mines are still spread over 78 countries worldwide. What's more, they remain functional decades after a… » 9/06/13 12:43pm 9/06/13 12:43pm

US Forces Will Soon Be Shooting DAGRs

Hellfire II missiles are accurate and powerful, but expensive. Hydra 70 rockets are relatively cheap but unguided and far less accurate, which increases the chances of incurring collateral damage. But by combining a Hellfire's guidance and launcher with a Hydra's warhead and propellant, Lockheed has created a deadly… » 3/06/13 1:23pm 3/06/13 1:23pm

Explosive Art Created With Rocket Fuel, Gunpowder, Propellants and…

Remember the name Matthew Stromberg, because this professor from the Savannah College of Art and Design could be the Michelangelo of munitions (if he manages to stay in one piece). Instead of traditional mediums, Stromberg prefers explosive materials to create his artwork. By damaging "canvases" like metal, wood and… » 6/26/08 5:00pm 6/26/08 5:00pm