The EPA Just Made NYC's Most Radioactive Place Into a Superfund Site

Yesterday, we enjoyed The New Yorker's engrossing interactive look at the strange history of NYC's most radioactive place, an auto shop in Queens that occupies a former factory that produced radioactive thorium for the Atomic Energy Commission. Today, after months of study, the Environmental Protection Agency decided… » 5/08/14 2:20pm 5/08/14 2:20pm

The Most Radioactive Place in New York City Is a Garage In Queens

Like so many NYC businesses, Primo Flat Fix occupies a nearly 100-year-old building. But this Queens, garage sits on a very peculiar piece of dirt: The former site of Wolff-Alport Chemical Company, a rare-earth supplier that furnished the Atomic Energy Commission with radioactive thorium—when it wasn't dumping the… » 5/07/14 12:40pm 5/07/14 12:40pm

Flying 3D Printers Could Help Seal Off Nuclear Waste

A quadcopter outfitted with an on-board 3D printer could be used to seal off and transport nuclear waste, or even to build structures in the middle of nowhere, according to its inventor, Mirko Kovac of Imperial College London. "In effect, it's the world's first flying 3D printer," New Scientist writes. "One day such… » 5/07/14 9:50am 5/07/14 9:50am

This Huge Nuclear Waste Dump Will Be Washed Away By Rising Sea Levels

A dumping ground for nuclear waste located near the British coast is "virtually certain" to be washed away by rising sea levels, a new report warns. The UK Environment Agency has admitted that constructing the Drigg Low-Level Waste Repository so near the coast was a mistake, and that one million cubic meters of… » 4/21/14 9:41am 4/21/14 9:41am

The Mob Is Secretly Dumping Nuclear Waste Across Italy and Africa

Organized crime is famously good at exploiting time-sensitive industries like construction, fishing, and—of course—garbage removal. But revelations about millions of tons of toxic waste buried haphazardly and illegally by the mob are causing an uproar in southern Italy, where cancer rates are nearly 50 percent higher… » 1/31/14 2:00pm 1/31/14 2:00pm

Radioactive Gold Rush: Nuclear Waste Storage Is a Booming Business

First, dig a hole. Then, reinforce it with clay, concrete, steel, and plastic. Fill it with nuclear waste and cover it in forty more feet of concrete. Then profit. That's how one company in Texas has struck radioactive gold, charging companies $10,000 per cubic foot to store nuclear refuse. » 1/21/14 11:20am 1/21/14 11:20am