Watch How Designers Re-engineered an Island to Make a Park in New York City

Parks aren’t always built just so we can enjoy the trees. On Governor’s Island in New York City, a truly unique public space will bring nature back to a former military base–and it’s engineered to withstand the catastrophic storms that climate change will bring. It’s called The Hills, and in this documentary, we talk… »11/09/15 12:30pm11/09/15 12:30pm

The Experimental Jungle Room Where NYC's Underground Park Is Taking Root 

When you walk into the Lowline Lab, the first thing you taste is oxygen. The Lab is hidden in an old warehouse, two blocks away from where the Lowline, a proposed underground park, is slated to open in 2020. The Lab is its prototype–part testing ground and part public sneak peek at the paradise that may one day grow… »10/21/15 10:40am10/21/15 10:40am

Video: The natural wonderland of the Redwoods is so soothing

Redwood National & State Parks in northern California is where some of the tallest trees in the world stand and is home to so many different species. More Than Just Parks spent several weeks inside the park capturing the forest and the beaches and the clouds and basically all the beautiful nature that exists there.… »9/22/15 10:30pm9/22/15 10:30pm

New Pavement Made From Tires Will Save Old Faithful's Groundwater

Labor Day Weekend is one of the busiest times at Yellowstone National Park, and its famous geyser, Old Faithful, reels in 90% of the park’s 3.6 million annual visitors. To keep that geyser reliably spewing steam and water 140 feet into the air every hour or two well into the future, the park is surrounding the thing… »9/04/15 9:20am9/04/15 9:20am

I Kayaked the Part of the Los Angeles River That Actually Looks Like a River

It was 90 degrees at 10:00 a.m. when I stepped off the Orange Line in the LA neighborhood of Van Nuys. A perfect day for the beach, or for the pool, or for positioning yourself directly beneath those little misters you can find at finer restaurants in the Valley. But I was about to embark upon a very different Los… »8/24/15 6:30pm8/24/15 6:30pm

Washington DC's Very Own High Line Will Clean Its Dirty River Water

The Anacostia River that runs through Washington DC has historically been known as, well, not the cleanest river in the country. A new elevated park straddling the river plans to filter the dirty water with a waterfall feature (apparently projected with Frederick Douglass's face). It's the winning design announced… »10/16/14 4:30pm10/16/14 4:30pm

L.A.'s 1930s Extension of Wilshire Blvd. Left Urban Scars

The message was clear: Los Angeles was not afraid to reshape its urban form to accommodate the automobile. Over the course of a few months in 1931, workers cleared a wide swath through three dense downtown blocks, demolishing buildings, tearing up foundations, and filling in basements—all to extend an automobile… »6/07/14 7:04pm6/07/14 7:04pm

L.A.'s Oldest Parks Began as Swamps and Other "Worthless" Lands

Park-poor Los Angeles: perhaps it's no surprise that many of the city's earliest parks were born of refuse lands. Flush with public land inherited from California's land grant days, Los Angeles was practically giving away real estate in the latter half of the nineteenth century, donating lots to private individuals or… »4/29/14 2:59pm4/29/14 2:59pm

Why Southwest Airlines Is Building Parks in Each of Its 90 Cities

Over the last 47 years, Southwest Airlines has built a vibrant—if a little goofy—airborne community. Now some of that culture is fueling urban improvements on the ground. Southwest's new initiative called the Heart of the Community is working to build public spaces in all of the 90 cities the airline serves. »4/15/14 3:40pm4/15/14 3:40pm