Why We Should Keep Trying to Time Travel

H.G. Wells coined the term "time machine" all the way back in 1895, just a decade before Einstein published his groundbreaking paper on special relativity that would begin show how time travel is possible. The fascination with using technology to look into the past or the future hasn't faded in the last century. And… » 11/20/14 10:03am 11/20/14 10:03am

A Radically New Particle Accelerator Could Have 500 Times the Power

If you know anything about the Large Hadron Collider, you know that it is huge. Massive. 17 miles of tunnels under Switzerland. Traditional accelerators need all that space to get particles to smash into each other at close to the speed of light. But scientists at Stanford have come one step closer to a new type of… » 11/06/14 4:30pm 11/06/14 4:30pm

Yes, Time Travel Is Possible; Here's How

Time travel's been one of man's wildest fantasies for centuries. It's long been a popular trend in movies and fiction, inspiring everything from Charles Dickens' A Christmas Carol to H.G. Wells' The Time Machine to the Charlton Heston shrine that is The Planet of the Apes. And with the opening of Interstellar » 11/05/14 1:25pm 11/05/14 1:25pm

Scientists Are Creating the Coldest Cubic Meter in the Universe

It's hard to describe exactly how cold the coldest cubic meter in the universe will be. Frozen to just a blip above absolute zero—the temperature at which atoms cannot even vibrate—the CUORE experiment will try to nail down a tiny number that has long eluded physicists: the mass of a neutrino. » 10/13/14 4:00pm 10/13/14 4:00pm

A Brief History of Scientists Hunting for Time Travelers

Time travel is possible—or at least a lot of serious physicists say so. It's probably not possible to pull it off in a souped-up Delorean, but there are wormholes, Tipler cylinders, and other Einstein-inspired theories for how it could work. Which raises the question: Why haven't we met any visitors from another time? » 10/09/14 3:03pm 10/09/14 3:03pm

Inventors of the Blue LED Inside Nearly Every Device You Own Win Nobel

There's pretty good chance you have a piece of this year's physics Nobel prize-winning invention in your pocket. The blue light-emitting diode (LED) is found in the screens of millions of phones as well as our bright, new energy-efficient LED lightbulbs. Today, the Nobel Prize in physics was awarded to the three… » 10/07/14 12:30pm 10/07/14 12:30pm

Why the Human Body Can't Handle Heavy Acceleration

Our bodies are surprisingly resilient in many situations, but rapid acceleration is not one of them. While the human body can withstand any constant speed—be it 20 miles per hour or 20 billion miles per hour—we can only change that rate of travel relatively slowly. Speed up or slow down too quickly and it's lights… » 10/01/14 2:20pm 10/01/14 2:20pm

Moon Seismometers From Apollo Are Still Helping Solve Physics Mysteries

When Apollo astronauts landed on the moon, they left flags and footprints, yes, but also dozens of scientific instruments. Among them was a network of seismometers originally meant to study moonquakes. Forty years later, data from these seismometers are still helping physicists understand how to detect elusive… » 9/30/14 5:25pm 9/30/14 5:25pm