This Elevation Map Of Mars Makes The Red Planet Much More Colorful

In this brand new map of the Ares Vallis region of Mars, released by the German space agency DLR, you can see the true differences in height between the high and low parts of our neighboring planet. The highest parts, expressed in red, are about 4000 meters (2.4 miles) above the lowest parts, in blue. » 4/14/15 10:30pm 4/14/15 10:30pm

Kepler Just Discovered a New Super-Earth, Against All Odds 

In May 2013, NASA's exoplanet-seeking spacecraft, Kepler, seemed doomed. Two of four wheels that stabilized its telescope had malfunctioned—and NASA appealed to scientists from around the world for ideas to salvage its mission. Yesterday, it announced the discovery of a brand-new super-Earth 180 light years from our… » 12/19/14 11:35am 12/19/14 11:35am

All the planets in the Solar System fit between the Earth and the Moon

I never thought of this, but you can fit all the planets in the Solar System back to back into the distance from the Earth to the Moon—about 238,900 miles (384,400 kilometers)—with room to spare: 4,990 miles (8,030 kilometers.) Seeing it visualized really give you a good idea of how much empty space is out there. » 10/23/14 10:42pm 10/23/14 10:42pm

Each of These Panoramic Pictures Is Its Own Tiny Twisted Planet

There are tons of 360-degree panoramic images out there, but Russian photographer Andrew Bodrov's latest work totally twists my mind. He depicts rockets, Mars rover Curiosity, statues of science and faith all embraced into lovely micro worlds, so simple and neat they could make a sweet set of scenery for a 21st… » 9/24/14 12:30pm 9/24/14 12:30pm

Short film: The dark side of the Earth is called human greed

I don't know how scientifically accurate the script of this short film by French director Aćim Vasić is. It seems very unlikely that planets can shift their orbits the way the film describes but there's something undeniably true that makes this movie worth watching: Its depiction of human greed. » 9/08/14 10:49pm 9/08/14 10:49pm

Here's How to Explore the Moon and Mars in Google Maps

Everyone's favorite lil' rover, Curiosity, has now been rolling around Mars for two years. So it's high time Google Maps got in on the action—and now, to celebrate the anniversary, it's launched Maps for Mars and the Moon. Getting pin man into space is pretty easy, if you follow a few steps. » 8/07/14 11:09am 8/07/14 11:09am

NASA: Ganymede is a water and ice Club Sandwich that may harbor life

NASA scientists says that the largest moon in the solar system may harbor life in its inner oceans. Previously, scientists thought Ganymede only had one ocean between two ice layers, but data reveals that its structure is "ice and oceans stacked up in several layers like a club sandwich." » 5/01/14 8:16pm 5/01/14 8:16pm

The Earth's Magnetic Field Keeps This Desktop Jupiter Globe Spinning

Jupiter is not only the largest planet in our solar system, it's also arguably the most stunning. Those massive storms—including that enormous red eye—produce quite an atmospheric show. And as a cheaper alternative to a giant telescope, this tiny desktop-sized version of Jupiter lets you stare in awe at the gas giant… » 4/22/14 5:00pm 4/22/14 5:00pm

Why Use the Fine China When You Have These Awesome Planetary Plates?

Back when Pluto had some status in our solar system, a handy way to remember the names of the planets was the 'My Very Educated Mother Just Served Us Nine Pizzas' mnemonic, where the first letter of each word represented each celestial orb. But it's just confusing now that Pluto's gone, so maybe a set of planet-themed… » 3/31/14 5:40pm 3/31/14 5:40pm

Astronomers found a minor planet with a ring system like Saturn's

For the first time ever, astronomers have identified a small planet with a ring system. They previously thought that such a phenomenon could only happen on large planets like Saturn and Jupiter. But this special space rock, known as 10199 Chariklo, is a small planet called a Centaur. » 3/26/14 3:38pm 3/26/14 3:38pm

This is how you blow up a planet, according to Neil deGrasse Tyson

Hayden Planetarium Director and supreme astrophysics badass Neil deGrasse Tyson recently took to his podcast, Star Talk Radio, to answer a few questions from the audience as read by noted funnyman Eugene Mirman. And fortunately for us, Grand Moff Tyson decided to take the one about blowing up planets. » 11/01/13 1:38pm 11/01/13 1:38pm

Scientists Found the Remains of a Water-Covered Earth-Like Planet

A team of astrophysicists have made an exciting however complex discovery a mere 170 light years away. In their own words, it's "the first evidence of a water-rich rocky planetary body" outside of our own solar system to have evidence of water. It's the "rocky" bit that makes it Earth-like. » 10/10/13 4:20pm 10/10/13 4:20pm