How to Make Sure Your Net Neutrality Comment Matters

If you're in favor of a neutral internet—one that's doled out equally to everyone, not preferentially to whomever pays the toll—you've got a few more hours to do something about it. At least, to do something about it the official way, by submitting a comment to the FCC urging the agency not to overturn net neutrality.… » 9/15/14 2:00pm Monday 2:00pm

Stop Pretending There's a Line Dividing Politics and Tech

"Silicon Valley is a place where seemingly impossible problems are solved every day," Ezra Klein writes in a new post for The Verge. "...while Washington is a place where solvable problems prove impossible to do anything about." Klein presents a huge chasm dividing the worlds of technology and politics. This idea is… » 8/20/14 5:23pm 8/20/14 5:23pm

I Prefer Watching These Heavily Slurred Versions of American History

Drunk History is in many ways the best show on television at the moment. You get the LOLs of absurdist sketch comedy while arming yourself with enough History Channel-quality Fun Facts™ to make you sound smart the next day. At the same time, it feels like hosting a party in your living room—one that inevitably ends… » 8/04/14 8:00pm 8/04/14 8:00pm

Ask Tim Wu—The Guy Who Coined "Net Neutrality"—Anything

Tim Wu is a busy man. When he's not teaching law at Columbia or writing for The New Yorker, he's testifying before Congress about the FCC proposed net neutrality. And as of last month, Wu is running for lieutenant governor of New York State. Busy might not be the right term, actually. Tim Wu is brimming with purpose. » 7/09/14 12:47pm 7/09/14 12:47pm

Who Should Really Decide Net Neutrality's Fate?

Tim Wu, the guy who coined the phrase "net neutrality," went nose-to-nose with the House Judiciary subcommittee on Friday morning to fight for the future of the internet. Congress wants to know if somebody other than the FCC should decide the fate of net neutrality. Wu, for one, thinks that's a pretty silly idea. » 6/20/14 1:20pm 6/20/14 1:20pm

What Would Change If Politicians Wrote Laws Based on Internet Polls?

A new political party, designed by software devs and engineers, is joining the race in California. If elected, PlaceAVote's Congressional candidates vow to decide on every bill based on the majority vote of their constituents—as measured via online polling. Could that sort of direct, digital democracy improve how… » 5/24/14 5:00pm 5/24/14 5:00pm

Here's Why the U.S. Missile Defense System Is Utterly Broken

Last month, the U.S. Government Accountability Office issued a scathing report: the system to defend the U.S. from ballistic missiles doesn't work, and probably never will. But it gets worse. Congress then voted to expand the broken system, allocating money for a new, sub-par missile defense site. How did this happen? » 5/09/14 11:19am 5/09/14 11:19am

Join the Debate: 3D Printed Guns or Government Regulation?

Here's the question: in a world where the design of a 3D printed gun is freely available on the internet, can we—or should we–regulate open source design? Or are limits impossible in a world of anonymous file sharing? Does any attempt at control go against the whole spirit of open source, decentralized innovation? » 4/01/14 2:00pm 4/01/14 2:00pm

The Internet’s Biggest Enemies

Reporters Without Borders (RSF) released its annual "Enemies of the Internet" index this week—a ranking first launched in 2006 intended to track countries that repress online speech, intimidate and arrest bloggers, and conduct surveillance of their citizens.Some countries have been mainstays on the annual index, while… » 3/14/14 7:45am 3/14/14 7:45am

The Mobile App Driving Venezuela's Anti-Government Protests

Zello is a walkie-talkie app made by a small company based in Austin, Texas—but if you've heard of it, it's probably because you've been following the news in Venezuela or Ukraine. Some of its biggest users are protesters taking to the streets. The app's creators hadn't planned on getting involved in political… » 2/25/14 12:20pm 2/25/14 12:20pm