Flooding, Anti-Vaxxers, Museums: What's Ruining Our Cities This Week

Flooding in Pakistan has stranded hundreds of thousands of people, an anti-vaccination movement trending in L.A.'s most affluent neighborhoods is causing a whooping cough epidemic, and one broken air conditioner could destroy Rome's most priceless art. Hope you're comfortable, this week's What's Ruining Our Cities is… » 9/14/14 3:00pm 9/14/14 3:00pm

No, Rome's Collapse Wasn't Caused By Lead Poisoning

Rome was the first city on the planet to have an extensive and efficient municipal water system, thanks to the empire's ambitious aqueduct system that's still found throughout Europe. But that infrastructure was also pumping ancient Romans with lead—up to 100 times the amount of lead found in local spring water. » 4/24/14 3:20pm 4/24/14 3:20pm

Archaeologist Uses 2,000-Year-Old Sky to Study Roman Ruins

If archaeology was once about digging through dirt, it is increasingly—like almost every other profession—about programming computers. Bernie Frischer, an Indiana University "archaeo-informaticist," has came up with a new theory about two Roman monuments. His finding are based on 3D reconstructions of the monuments… » 12/19/13 6:20pm 12/19/13 6:20pm

Ancient Romans Built Monuments Centuries Before Archaeologists Believed

We already knew Rome wasn't built in a day. But it turns out it took a lot longer to build than anyone imagined. According to The New York Times, last summer an archeological dig about 11 miles from central Rome revealed that the Romans were erecting monuments far earlier than we previously thought. » 8/21/13 11:00am 8/21/13 11:00am