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Guatemala's "Volcano of Fire" Lives Up to Its Name, Spectacularly

While not as dramatic as its eruption in February, which necessitated evacuations and the closure of a nearby airport, the “Volcan de Fuego” in San Juan Altotenago, Guatemala, rumbled anew on Wednesday, July 1, when this photo was taken. It is one of Central America’s most active peaks. » 7/02/15 9:30pm 7/02/15 9:30pm

NASA's Thermal Camera Turns Galapagos Volcano Into an Eruption from Hell

After 33 years without a peep, the highest volcano in the Galapagos began belching hot magma in May. The eruption was pretty badass on its own, but a new NASA photo, digitally altered to look as if rivers of black lava are streaming down a red mountainside, makes it look like it occurred in an otherworldly hell. » 7/01/15 6:40pm 7/01/15 6:40pm

Machines Sensed the Nepal Earthquake from 8,000 Miles Away

When a massive earthquake struck Nepal on April 25, it created seismic waves that traveled around the world in a matter of minutes, propagating swiftly through Earth’s crust and mantle to rattle seismic stations in the US. The Nepal quake was devastating, but the fact that it was felt 8,000 miles away is actually not… » 5/04/15 1:15pm 5/04/15 1:15pm

Stunning footage of molten lava proves that volcanoes are hell monsters

This is the most terrifying thing I've seen in a long time. Like, monsters are real and the apocalypse is nigh terrifying. And yet I can't look away because the footage of Hawaii's Kilauea volcano is so stunning that I can smell my fear burning as the molten lava rock starts taking over the Earth. » 3/18/15 6:57pm 3/18/15 6:57pm

This High-Altitude Overlook Perfectly Frames a Volcano

It takes some work to get to Ecuador's Quilotoa Lake. Visiting the collapsed volcano requires hiring a bus or truck to navigate the steep roads, and a hardy constitution to endure its 12,000-foot altitude. Now a simple yet elegant platform allows a moment of meditative respite on the precipitous edge of the electric… » 12/08/14 5:55pm 12/08/14 5:55pm

Lightning can be heard halfway around the world via radio

Lightning, as we know, is an awesome burst of energy. When lightning strikes, some of that energy can be converted into radio waves that then zip through space along Earth's magnetic field, so that lightning in Alaska can be heard as "whistlers" on a radio receiver all the way in New Zealand. » 7/25/14 5:57pm 7/25/14 5:57pm