In this week's Tech Reads: robot ethics, training to fly in space, the history of the selfie, and so much more.

  • Ken Auletta looks at how Netflix is changing television, starting with the company's early days courting Blockbuster. [The New Yorker]
  • Jerry Saltz gives us a history of the selfie. Turns out, it's been around for much longer than the smartphone. [Vulture]
  • Eileen Bjorkman tells the fascinating story of the F-16 fighter jet, a scrappy program that, at the outset, produced a somewhat cobbled together plane. [Air & Space]
  • Adrianne Jeffries examines the ethics of war machines, asking if robots should ever decide for themselves when to kill. [The Verge]
  • Jacob Ward shows exactly what kind of training space tourists will have to undergo before buckling in to a Virgin Galactic or XCOR flight. [PopSci]
  • Eric Levenson breaks down the game theory behind this week's fascinating, frustrating to watch Jeopardy! champion, Arthur Chu. [The Wire]
  • John Herrman asks what happened to the fervent, then forgotten, push to make a cleaner, quieter, more exclusive internet. [Buzzfeed]
  • Former TSA agent Jason Edward Harrington's often hilarious, sometimes shocking account after working five years with the agency. [Politico]
  • Alex Garkavenko shows how urban design can actually keep people out of cities. [Atlantic Cities]

Image: Nicholas Stango