This image was lost some time after publication, but you can still view it here.

It appears Satoru Iwata got his hands on the DIY Potential Nintendo Revolution Controller and was able to design this gem. The controller was unveiled at the Tokyo Game Show in Iwata's keynote at roughly 10:45 EST last night.

Check out more details and pictures after the jump.

Here is the lowdown, get ready folks, it is INTENSE! This is a one-handed (for the most part) controller. The "A" button sits as the primary button underneath the thumb. Above is the traditional D-pad. Also features are the start, select buttons and a new console power button along with a "home" button that Nintendo did not mention much about. Underneath the controller is a "B" button.

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The most intriguing aspect of this controller is the mouse-esque features. Two sensors are placed by the television and they track the movement of the controller. So the bad news is that you may actually have to move around to play these games. Yeah I know, breaking a sweat will definitely suck. A fishing demo made best examples of this 3D movement detection at the keynote.

For those of us (me) who aren t too in love with the idea of swinging a controller at the television to play a game, this is where the accessory port comes into play. This is a small port at the base of the controller that allows other accessories to be plugged in. The pictures show an analog control stick that could easily replace the 3D movement.

Miyamoto, often thought of as the father of Nintendo, said the idea for the controller was to make something simple, straightforward and could reach out to new audiences by utilizing modern technologies.

More details will come as soon as we get them.

Revolution Controller Finally Revealed [1up.com]

This image was lost some time after publication, but you can still view it here.
This image was lost some time after publication, but you can still view it here.
This image was lost some time after publication, but you can still view it here.
This image was lost some time after publication, but you can still view it here.
This image was lost some time after publication, but you can still view it here.